Weather

Dangerous, prolonged heat expected in Kansas City metro area into the weekend

An excessive heat warning in effect for the Kansas City area as well as areas along and south of the Missouri river as temperatures are expected to climb to near 100 each day into the weekend. The heat index for each day will reach as high as 112 degrees.
An excessive heat warning in effect for the Kansas City area as well as areas along and south of the Missouri river as temperatures are expected to climb to near 100 each day into the weekend. The heat index for each day will reach as high as 112 degrees. The Star

The brunt of the recent heat spell arrives Thursday in Kansas City, but don't expect too much relief once the sun goes down.

Because of anticipated dangerous and prolonged heat, the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill has issued an excessive heat warning for the Kansas City metro as well as surrounding areas along and south of the Missouri River. The warning is effect until Saturday evening.

Highs on Thursday are expected to be near 100 degrees, with it feeling as hot as 112 degrees because of the high humidity. The good news is that Thursday will be the hottest day, according to the Weather Service.

Unfortunately, Friday and Saturday are expected to be nearly as hot, with highs in the mid to upper 90s. The heat index for each day is expected to top out around 108 degrees.

Also, there will be no relief over night. Morning lows will likely fall to between 75 and 80 degrees, according to the Weather Service.

On July 1, a new Kansas law will go into effect that will legally protect Good Samaritans who break a window to rescue a person or animal. Amber Rollins, director of KidsAndCars.org, demonstrates how to safely break a window using a device.

Far northern and northeastern Missouri will be under a heat advisory through Saturday as well. Highs will be in the mid to upper 90s with the heat index near 110 degrees.

nws heat stroke exhaustion photo
National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill

Above normal temperatures are likely next week as well as the possibility of drier than normal conditions. The hot and dry conditions could lead to a worsening and expansion of severe drought conditions across northern Missouri.

People are urged to avoid spending too much time outdoors and to drink plenty of water. Those headed outside should wear light clothing and sunscreen and make sure to take frequent breaks in shade or air-conditioned areas.

The combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will create dangerous conditions where heat illnesses are likely. Young children and pets should not be left unattended in vehicles.

The deadly heat wave that gripped the central United States in the summer of 1980 killed hundreds of people.

Robert A. Cronkleton: 816-234-4261, @cronkb
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