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Severe storms are expected this week. Here's what you need to know, Kansas City

Learn about the different types of thunderstorms

Learn the difference between all the different types of thunderstorms from single cell storms, multi-cell clusters, squall lines, and supercells.
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Learn the difference between all the different types of thunderstorms from single cell storms, multi-cell clusters, squall lines, and supercells.

Strong and severe thunderstorms capable of producing large hail, damaging winds and a few tornadoes are expected to develop in the region Tuesday, but it appears Kansas City will miss the severe weather — at least for a day.

"For the Kansas City area, it looks like most of the storms will stay up to the north," said Jenni Laflin, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill.

A few thunderstorms popped up Tuesday morning in the Kansas City area. But that storm activity was expected to dissipate by the late morning hours.

Severe weather is also expected to develop Wednesday afternoon and evening across central Kansas and then moving northeast across northern Missouri, including the Kansas City area.

"During the Wednesday evening and overnight period, we could see scattered thunderstorms," Laflin said. "A few of those storms could be severe. The main threats are going to be hail and wind, but we can't rule out an isolated tornado as well."

The storms are expected to move into the Kansas City area late evening.

There is a potential for heavy rain and flash flood developing, depending on how the storms set up and how many storms move over the same area, she said.

Some of the storms could continue all day Thursday morning.

"A few of those storms could become strong," Laflin said.

But there's uncertainty in the forecast because the strength of any storms on Thursday depends on how Wednesday's storms set up, how quickly they move out and if they redevelop.

"This is kind of our first severe weather event of the year, so it's definitely time to review those (severe weather) plans and make sure you of ways of receiving warnings," Laflin said.

Robert A. Cronkleton: 816-234-4261, @cronkb
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