Weather

Severe storms possible Wednesday to Friday in KC and areas north of the metro

Lightning safety tips from the National Weather Service

Lightning is more dangerous than many people think. Watch this informative video and learn how to be safe. Lighting photo from the Associated Press.
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Lightning is more dangerous than many people think. Watch this informative video and learn how to be safe. Lighting photo from the Associated Press.

A round of severe thunderstorms are expected to move into the Kansas City area Wednesday night, bringing the chance for damaging winds and hail.

The best chance for severe weather is north of the Kansas City area where severe storms could form Wednesday afternoon if the skies clear and temperatures heat up, according to the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill.

The afternoon storms could produce large hail, damaging winds and isolated tornadoes across northern Missouri.

The main round of storms is expected in the Kansas City area Wednesday night as a line of storms drop south out of Iowa. The main threat will be damaging winds, according to the National Weather Service.

Severe storms will possible again Thursday afternoon and evening. Large hail and damaging winds will be the primary threat. The National Weather Service is not ruling out the possibility of tornadoes.

In addition, some areas could see flooding as they are hit by repeated rounds of rain. The threat of hail, damaging winds and flooding is expected to continue Thursday night into Friday, according to the National Weather Service.

Another complex of thunderstorms is expected Friday. The storms should be through by Friday.

The storms the next three days could bring 2 to 4 inches of rain to northern Missouri. Areas south of Interstate 70 may see about a half inch of rain with areas in between getting 1 to 2 inches of rain, according to the National Weather Service.

The area is expected to dry out Saturday and part of Sunday, but storms could move back Sunday afternoon through Monday and possibly on July 4th, according to the National Weather Service.

Robert A. Cronkleton: 816-234-4261, @cronkb

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