Campus Corner

NCAA releases academic data: KU, K-State, Mizzou and UMKC teams post high scores

Kansas State, Kansas, Missouri and the University of Missouri-Kansas City all posted high Academic Progress Rate scores, according to NCAA data released Wednesday.
Kansas State, Kansas, Missouri and the University of Missouri-Kansas City all posted high Academic Progress Rate scores, according to NCAA data released Wednesday. The Associated Press

Several of the Kansas City area’s Division I athletic programs posted high marks in the NCAA’s annual Academic Progress Rates released Wednesday.

Four Kansas State teams posted perfect scores of 1,000 — men’s cross country and golf and women’s cross country and volleyball.

The Missouri women’s swimming and diving team also posted a perfect score, and the men’s indoor and outdoor track programs led the Southeastern Conference in APR scores. On average, MU teams posted the second-best APR in the conference at 987, trailing only Vanderbilt at 992.

No Kansas teams received perfect scores, but the men’s basketball team led KU with a 995 mark and was honored last week with the NCAA’s Public Recognition Award for the eighth consecutive year. The award honors teams with scores in the top 10 percent nationally.

The Mizzou women’s swimming and diving team and indoor track team, which posted a score of 998, also received the Public Recognition Award, as did the four K-State teams with perfect scores.

UMKC women’s volleyball team led the Kangaroos with a score of 995.

No KU, K-State, Mizzou or UMKC team was close to the cutoff of 930, which determines penalties.

Nationally, this year’s overall four-year average, 978, was up two points from last year’s record high. Men’s basketball came in at 961, a four-point jump over 2013-2014. Football had a 956, a five-point increase in one year.

Scores are calculated for each team at each school. An athlete receives one point each semester for being academically eligible and another point each semester for staying in school.

This year, 21 teams face postseason bans and 28 face other penalties. Last year, 42 teams had postseason bans and 70 faced other punishments.

“We are pleased and proud of their accomplishments,” NCAA president Mark Emmert said in a statement released by the NCAA. “Our goal always has been to encourage students to achieve academically and earn their degrees. Every year, Division I students prove that both academic and athletic success are achievable.”

No schools from the five richest conferences — the Atlantic Coast, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC — or the Football Bowl Subdivision are facing punishments. In contrast, 15 of the 21 teams facing postseason bans, and 23 of the 28 teams being sanctioned with Level 1, 2 or 3 penalties, come from institutions defined as limited-resource schools, even though the NCAA has given those schools more leeway after the cutline was increased to 930 two years ago.

Teams competing in the five power conferences had an average single-year APR score of 985, while those in all other conferences had an average score of 979. The power conferences also had better scores in eligibility and retention.

Five Football Championship Subdivision teams — Alabama State, Florida A&M, Gardner-Webb, Savannah State and Tennessee State — received postseason bans. Men’s basketball teams at Alcorn State, Central Arkansas, Florida A&M and Stetson also will not be eligible for next year’s NCAA tournament. The only women’s basketball team to make the banned list was Savannah State.

All of those schools with the exception of Central Arkansas, Gardner-Webb and Stetson are considered historically black colleges or universities.

Critics have long contended that the APR is not an accurate measure of academic progress because the numbers can be skewed by various factors such as clustering athletes in certain classes or majors or steering students to certain instructors. They also say athletic departments at the wealthiest schools are seeing the dividends of investing heavily in academic resource centers and tutors that other schools and other students don’t have access to.

APR scores for KU, K-State, Mizzou and UMKC

Kansas

APR

Baseball

956

Football

945

Men’s basketball

995

Men’s cross country

975

Men’s golf

985

Men’s indoor track

954

Men’s outdoor track

950

Softball

978

Women’s basketball

956

Women’s cross country

993

Women’s golf

986

Women’s rowing

983

Women’s soccer

965

Women’s swimming and diving

973

Women’s tennis

969

Women’s indoor track

970

Women’s indoor track

970

Women’s volleyball

990

Kansas State

APR

Baseball

955

Football

976

Men’s basketball

980

Men’s cross country

1,000

Men’s golf

1,000

Men’s indoor track

948

Men’s outdoor track

958

Women’s basketball

985

Women’s cross country

1,000

Women’s golf

986

Women’s rowing

973

Women’s tennis

969

Women’s indoor track

968

Women’s outdoor track

973

Women’s volleyball

1,000

Missouri

APR

Baseball

976

Football

976

Men’s basketball

941

Men’s cross country

996

Men’s golf

994

Men’s swimming and diving

981

Men’s indoor track

988

Men’s outdoor track

988

Men’s wrestling

986

Softball

994

Women’s basketball

987

Women’s cross country

991

Women’s golf

993

Women’s gymnastics

992

Women’s soccer

987

Women’s swimming and diving

1,000

Women’s tennis

992

Women’s indoor track

998

Women’s outdoor track

998

Women’s volleyball

994

UMKC

APR

Men’s basketball

965

Men’s cross country

986

Men’s golf

982

Men’s soccer

971

Men’s tennis

957

Men’s indoor track

980

Men’s outdoor track

980

Softball

967

Women’s basketball

987

Women’s cross country

989

Women’s golf

982

Women’s soccer

974

Women’s tennis

984

Women’s indoor track

984

Women’s outdoor track

986

Women쬬¬¢s volleyball

995

Source: NCAA data

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