Royals

‘There’s a lot of concern’ as Florida native Eric Hosmer keeps eye on Hurricane Irma

Eric Hosmer is keeping an eye on Hurricane Irma

Kansas City Royals first baseman Eric Hosmer's family has decided to ride out Hurricane Irma as it approaches the coast of Florida.
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Kansas City Royals first baseman Eric Hosmer's family has decided to ride out Hurricane Irma as it approaches the coast of Florida.

While the Royals’ homestand continues through Wednesday, many on the team will be keeping an eye on their hometowns.

Hurricane Irma is bearing down on Florida, and it could impact a number of family members of the Royals.

The storm is expected to reach Miami on Sunday morning, and projections show it could move north through Florida and Georgia. Royals coaches Pedro Grifol and Dave Eiland could be affected, along with Royals manager Ned Yost, who has a farm in Greenville, Ga.

“We’re not going to get it as bad as Pedro’s family in Miami or Dave (Eiland, the Royals pitching coach) in Clearwater,” Yost said. It’s supposed to slow down (in Georgia). Somewhere between 35 to 50 mph winds.”

Hurricane Irma tore through the Caribbean as a Category 5 hurricane before losing some wind speed as it headed to Cuba.

The storm’s eye remained to the north of Cuba, Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) and Puerto Rico, but the continental United States will not be as lucky. The National Weather Service predicts Hurricane Irma to make landfall in south Florida early Sunday morning as a “major hurricane with wind speed greater than 110 mph.”

The storm, Florida governor Rick Scott warned Friday, is “way bigger than Andrew.” Hurricane Andrew ravaged south Florida in August of 1992, with Miami-Dade County sustaining damage caused by winds and storm surge “characteristic of a Category 4” storm, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Hosmer grew up in nearby Broward County and went to Plantation High School there. He admitted “there’s a lot of concern” about Irma and hoped his parents would have come to Kansas City.

However, they are going to wait out the storm in Florida.

“Of course you want them to get out of there and get as far away from it as possible,” Hosmer said. “But at this point it’s just a waiting game and you hope it (the hurricane) goes someplace else.”

However, Hosmer understands why his parents and others are staying where they live. He says there wasn’t time to leave.

“You are basically told a hurricane is coming in two days, so you have to clean up everything outside your house, bring everything inside that has the ability to fly around and go through windows and stuff,” Hosmer said. “There’s obviously a lot of traffic and a lot of stuff that goes with leaving.”

Pete Grathoff: 816-234-4330, @pgrathoff

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