University of Kansas

KU's Bill Self on 15-person panel that will suggest new NCAA basketball rules

Kansas basketball coach Bill Self talks to the media during the Final Four in San Antonio. Kansas lost to Villanova in the national semfinals on March 31, 2018.
Kansas basketball coach Bill Self talks to the media during the Final Four in San Antonio. Kansas lost to Villanova in the national semfinals on March 31, 2018. Associated Press

Kansas' Bill Self will be one of two active basketball coaches who will help create new NCAA proposals following the announcement of the Commission on College Basketball's recommendations earlier this week.

Self, along with St. Joseph's Phil Martelli, is a member of the 15-person Division I men's basketball oversight committee, which will be asked to create legislative rule changes that can be voted on by the NCAA Board of Governors in August.

Jim Haney, executive director of the National Association of Basketball Coaches, explained the steps ahead in a video released Friday morning.

"To us, (the process) is sort of like a game. The first half is over," Haney said. "We now know where we stand and what the score is, but we have plenty of work to do as we move forward."

Self was NABC president for 2017-18 and serves on the NABC board of directors. He commented earlier this week on the proposals put forward by the college basketball commission headed by former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

The Commission on College Basketball recommended harsher penalties, including a 5-year postseason ban, for NCAA programs that are guilty of Level I infractions.

“We appreciate their time and efforts on this project," Self said of the committee members. "The recommendations by the commission will create further discussions and implementations that will lead to significant changes for the good of our game in the near future."

Self's KU program has been directly impacted by the recent FBI probe, which led to the NCAA creating an independent commission to study how college basketball could address its biggest issues. According to a superseding FBI indictment released earlier this month, the mother and a guardian of two unidentified KU student-athletes — believed to be Billy Preston and Silvio De Sousa — are said to have benefited from illegal payments, which were made without the knowledge of the university.

  Comments