College Sports

Reports: FBI investigation could show dozens of basketball teams broke NCAA rules

ESPN.com reported Wednesday that the FBI’s investigation into college basketball corruption could result in “potential NCAA violations for as many as three dozen Division I programs.”
ESPN.com reported Wednesday that the FBI’s investigation into college basketball corruption could result in “potential NCAA violations for as many as three dozen Division I programs.” AP

Kansas’ Bill Self, president of the National Basketball Coaches Association, said Thursday he had not seen an ESPN.com report that the FBI’s investigation into college basketball corruption could result in “potential NCAA violations for as many as three dozen Division I programs.”

ESPN senior writer Mark Schlabach’s article, which was published Wednesday, quoted unnamed sources with knowledge of the FBI investigation as saying violations could be revealed, “based on information included in wiretap conversations from the defendants and financial records, e-mails and cell phone records seized from NBA agent Andy Miller. His office was raided on the same day the FBI arrested 10 men, including four assistant coaches, in late September.” One source told ESPN that “the teams that are already there,” not mid-major programs, were involved.

Asked to respond, Self told The Star: “Without seeing the report, I basically reserve comment. I hope it’s inaccurate. I certainly don’t know enough to make a comment.”

Told that it involves the records seized from Miller, Self said: “I do not know anything about that.”

Asked if he’s worried about the profession or his school, Self said: “We’re obviously all concerned for our profession. I do not have any information to comment one way or another. Like I said, I hope the reports are not accurate, but whatever is found out we’ll deal with it and were going to do all we can to make it better so we don’t have to put ourselves in a position to be looked at in this manner again,” he added referring to college basketball as a whole.

ESPN’s Schlabach wrote that sources said “many of the alleged incidents involve illegal cash payments to prospects and their families, as well as players and their families receiving tens of thousands of dollars from agents while they were still playing in college. In some cases, according to the sources, NCAA head coaches were aware of the payments, while others didn’t have knowledge of the schemes.”

Self had no further comment on the matter.

Later Thursday, Yahoo Sports’ Pete Thamel published a story, citing anonymous sources, that said documents and wiretaps obtained by investigators could put up to 50 college basketball programs in NCAA trouble.

“This goes a lot deeper in college basketball than four corrupt assistant coaches,” one source who was briefed on the details of the case told Yahoo. “When this all comes out, Hall of Fame coaches should be scared, lottery picks won’t be eligible to play and almost half of the 16 teams the NCAA showed on its initial NCAA tournament show this weekend should worry about their appearance being vacated.”

Gary Bedore: 816-234-4068, @garybedore

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