Controversial pill. Dr. David Grimes of the University of California at San Francisco holds a container of the abortion pill RU-486.

FILE-- Dr. David Grimes of the University of California, San Francisco holds a container of the controversial abortion pill RU-486 in San Francisco on May 3, 1994. The drug RU-486 could be licensed for use in the United States within two years, because of an agreement announced on Monday, May 16, 1994, that gives French drug patents to an international research agency. (AP Photo/Susan Ragan)
Controversial pill. Dr. David Grimes of the University of California at San Francisco holds a container of the abortion pill RU-486. FILE-- Dr. David Grimes of the University of California, San Francisco holds a container of the controversial abortion pill RU-486 in San Francisco on May 3, 1994. The drug RU-486 could be licensed for use in the United States within two years, because of an agreement announced on Monday, May 16, 1994, that gives French drug patents to an international research agency. (AP Photo/Susan Ragan) ASSOCIATED PRESS ASSOCIATED PRESS
Controversial pill. Dr. David Grimes of the University of California at San Francisco holds a container of the abortion pill RU-486. FILE-- Dr. David Grimes of the University of California, San Francisco holds a container of the controversial abortion pill RU-486 in San Francisco on May 3, 1994. The drug RU-486 could be licensed for use in the United States within two years, because of an agreement announced on Monday, May 16, 1994, that gives French drug patents to an international research agency. (AP Photo/Susan Ragan) ASSOCIATED PRESS ASSOCIATED PRESS

Here’s what would happen if Roe v. Wade were overturned and abortions were illegal

July 13, 2018 08:35 PM