In this 1998 file photo, a statue of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest was put up on private property along Interstate 65 in Nashville, Tenn. The statue is one of several of Forrest, an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan, that have faced scrutiny after nine people were shot dead at a black church in Charleston, S.C. Following the killings, a bipartisan mix of officials across the country is calling for the removal of Confederate flags and other symbols of the Confederacy from public places.
In this 1998 file photo, a statue of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest was put up on private property along Interstate 65 in Nashville, Tenn. The statue is one of several of Forrest, an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan, that have faced scrutiny after nine people were shot dead at a black church in Charleston, S.C. Following the killings, a bipartisan mix of officials across the country is calling for the removal of Confederate flags and other symbols of the Confederacy from public places. Mark Humphrey The Associated Press
In this 1998 file photo, a statue of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest was put up on private property along Interstate 65 in Nashville, Tenn. The statue is one of several of Forrest, an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan, that have faced scrutiny after nine people were shot dead at a black church in Charleston, S.C. Following the killings, a bipartisan mix of officials across the country is calling for the removal of Confederate flags and other symbols of the Confederacy from public places. Mark Humphrey The Associated Press

Ditching Confederate artifacts is only a start in facing American racism

June 25, 2015 08:46 PM