Lewis Diuguid

Coke, Pepsi downsize cans and bottles to satisfy consumer tastes

A 7.5-ounce can of Coca-cola, right, is posed next to a 12-ounce can for comparison. As people cut back on soda, the two beverage giants, Coke and Pepsi, are increasingly pushing smaller cans and bottles they say contain fewer calories and induce less calorie-counting guilt.
A 7.5-ounce can of Coca-cola, right, is posed next to a 12-ounce can for comparison. As people cut back on soda, the two beverage giants, Coke and Pepsi, are increasingly pushing smaller cans and bottles they say contain fewer calories and induce less calorie-counting guilt. The Associated Press

It’s sad that Coke and Pepsi are joining the march of other food products toward smaller containers. But that’s the trend, and people apparently are going for it.

The traditional 12-ounce and 2-liter bottles of Coke will be taking a back seat to the 7.5-ounce mini-cans and 1.25-liter bottles of Coke, The Associated Press reports. The change is partly driven by consumers wanting to live healthier lives.

The smaller sizes contain fewer calories, and consumers want to cut back. But they’ll be paying more per ounce for the privilege.

Yet sales show that’s what people want. Sales of Coke’s smaller sizes were up 9 percent last year through October, company officials reported compared with sales of 12-ounce cans and 2-liter bottles being up 0.1 percent.

Neither Coke nor Pepsi is dumping the more traditional sizes. Beverage Digest reports that in 2013 mini-cans accounted for 1.1 percent of sales volume in supermarkets but 2.4 percent of sales dollars.

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