An aerial photo in November 2015 shows a small section of an atoll that has slipped beneath the water line, only showing a small pile of rocks at low tide on Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. While most countries think of climate change in terms of economic costs, Pacific atolls and remote island groups in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean picture a world map without them on it. Rising seas are already eroding their coast lines and contaminating their freshwater wells.
An aerial photo in November 2015 shows a small section of an atoll that has slipped beneath the water line, only showing a small pile of rocks at low tide on Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. While most countries think of climate change in terms of economic costs, Pacific atolls and remote island groups in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean picture a world map without them on it. Rising seas are already eroding their coast lines and contaminating their freshwater wells. Rob Griffith The Associated Press
An aerial photo in November 2015 shows a small section of an atoll that has slipped beneath the water line, only showing a small pile of rocks at low tide on Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. While most countries think of climate change in terms of economic costs, Pacific atolls and remote island groups in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean picture a world map without them on it. Rising seas are already eroding their coast lines and contaminating their freshwater wells. Rob Griffith The Associated Press

Lewis Diuguid: Climate change cost is destined to rise

March 08, 2016 09:00 AM