Lewis Diuguid

Premiere of Sony film, ‘The Interview,’ draws threat from hackers that people should take seriously

A poster for the movie “The Interview” is carried away by a worker on Wednesday after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater in Atlanta. Georgia-based Carmike Cinemas has decided to cancel its planned showings of “The Interview” in the wake of threats against theatergoers by the Sony hackers.
A poster for the movie “The Interview” is carried away by a worker on Wednesday after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater in Atlanta. Georgia-based Carmike Cinemas has decided to cancel its planned showings of “The Interview” in the wake of threats against theatergoers by the Sony hackers. The Associated Press

There are some things people should never do — like talk about guns and bombs when standing in a security line at any airport.

Another is threatening a 9/11-style terrorist attack for the opening of any movie. Yet, that’s what hackers calling themselves the “Guardians of Peace” did for the premiere of Sony Pictures’ film, “The Interview.”

It’s not funny, but the movie is a comedy about a CIA plot to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Again, not funny. North Korea has nukes, and its relations with Western countries like South Korea, Japan and the United States can only euphemistically be described as tense.

The hackers have created massive problems for Sony, grabbing email and personal information and posting it for the media others to see. Now the hackers are warning people to stay away from theaters where “The Interview” was supposed to premiere this week.

Wisely, many theaters decided to pull Thursday’s first showing the film. The movie is to open in theaters nationwide on Christmas Day.

The threat resurrects the dread from the July 20, 2012, midnight mass killings during the showing of “The Dark Night Rises” at the Century Aurora 16 Multiplex Theater, in Aurora, Colo. Eighteen minutes into the movie, a gunman opened fire, killing 12 persons and wounding 58 others.

No one wants a repeat of anything like that. The Department of Homeland Security told The Associated Press that there is “no credible intelligence to indicate an active plot against movie theaters,” yet it is looking into the case.

Security has been increased in New York and Los Angeles ahead of Thursday’s premiere. The threat will likely cause crowds to avoid going to theaters showing “The Interview” or any other film.

That would be a tragedy because then those behind the terrorist threat will have won — again.

  Comments