Lewis Diuguid

Kansas City area tie to terrorist attack in Texas runs counter to Muslim groups’ efforts of peace

Personnel on Monday removed the bodies of two gunmen in Garland, Texas. Police shot and killed the men after they opened fire on a security officer outside the suburban Dallas venue, which was hosting provocative contest for Prophet Muhammad cartoons Sunday night, authorities said.
Personnel on Monday removed the bodies of two gunmen in Garland, Texas. Police shot and killed the men after they opened fire on a security officer outside the suburban Dallas venue, which was hosting provocative contest for Prophet Muhammad cartoons Sunday night, authorities said. The Associated Press

For more than 20 years, Muslim groups and individuals in the Kansas City area have spent countless hours and held community events trying to convince people that they love the United States, are peace-promotors and are not terrorists.

The reaction was brought on first by the April, 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring more than 650 others. That turned out to be home-grown terrorism.

Local Muslims had to enlarge their pro-America efforts after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania that killed nearly 3,000 people.

So it must have jolted people particularly hard to learn Tuesday that one of the two gunmen killed in Texas when the shooters opened fire on a Prophet Muhammad cartoon contest had family in Overland Park. Nadir Soofi and Elton Simpson were shot to death. On Tuesday, the Islamic State claimed responsibility, marking the first time that terrorist group has said it was behind an attack on U.S. soil.

Soofi father, Azam Soofi, is an engineer. The family is grieving the loss and questioning how such a thing could happen.

Muslims in this area and groups will likely have to increase their efforts to convince people they are peaceful and love this country as much as anyone else.

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