Lewis Diuguid

Health KC has uphill battle against old couch-potato habits

People who eat right and walk or run for exercise will love the Healthy KC initiative. The push for improved health and well-being also is aimed at Kansas City area couch potatoes.
People who eat right and walk or run for exercise will love the Healthy KC initiative. The push for improved health and well-being also is aimed at Kansas City area couch potatoes. The Associated Press

People who eat right and live healthy, active lives do so without incentives. They always have.

Those who don’t, won’t and no one can make them. We have a lot of the latter in the Kansas City area.

Yet, the Greater Kansas City Chamber and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City want to try to push metro area couch potatoes to change their unhealthy ways.

That’s the plan behind Healthy KC. It wants to get more grocery stores in urban food deserts, where few exist; raise the age of tobacco purchases from 18 to 21; make streets more inviting for pedestrians and people on bicycles; improve social and mental health services; and get more people to participate in fitness initiatives.

Good luck with all of that. It’s like New Year’s resolutions.

Every late December, people vow to lose weight and live healthier. They join fitness centers or buy exercise equipment.

It goes great for the first few weeks of January, and then backsliding sets in. The fitness center memberships lapse, and the exercise equipment gets sold at spring garage sales — like right about now.

Those who work out and eat fresh fruits and vegetables always will. Healthy KC may get a few more couch potatoes off the bench.

But old habits like binging on barbecue, fried food and beer will set in afterward, and the area will focus on some other fad.

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