Lewis Diuguid

Grass may turn to green for lobbyists in Washington, D.C.

Marijuana-themed flip-flops and boxer shorts sold by souvenir entrepreneur Ann Jordan, in Aurora, Colo., could become hit items in Washington, D.C., after recreational marijuana sales clear some final hurdles. In the nation’s capital, however, such souvenirs would have pictures of well-known monuments.
Marijuana-themed flip-flops and boxer shorts sold by souvenir entrepreneur Ann Jordan, in Aurora, Colo., could become hit items in Washington, D.C., after recreational marijuana sales clear some final hurdles. In the nation’s capital, however, such souvenirs would have pictures of well-known monuments. The Associated Press

With pot soon to be legal in the nation’s capital now, lobbyists will have a lot more they can use to lure lawmakers to vote the way they want.

Voters decided in November to allow growing and possessing small amounts of marijuana. That went into effect Thursday.

Washington, D.C., would join Colorado and Washington state, where voters earlier approved the use and sale of recreational marijuana. It is a product sold and taxed.

There has been some push-back by Congress, but it’s nothing a little doobie can fix. In addition to meals and alcoholic beverages, lobbyists can offer lawmakers grass-baked products like brownies, cookies, pies and cakes.

There of course is the good old-fashion, roll-your-own reefer. Many in the House and Senate grew up with marijuana being used, albeit illegally, by others.

Some may be like former President Bill Clinton, who admitted smoking weed, but of course, he didn’t inhale.

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