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Flooding closes U.S. 36 near Chillicothe as rivers rise around Missouri

Floodwaters threaten U.S. 36 east of New Cambria, Missouri

The Missouri Highway Patrol flew over U.S. east of New Cambria, Missouri, Wednesday, May 29, 2019, to check on floodwaters from the Chariton River that were threatening the highway.
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The Missouri Highway Patrol flew over U.S. east of New Cambria, Missouri, Wednesday, May 29, 2019, to check on floodwaters from the Chariton River that were threatening the highway.

Authorities closed U.S. 36 highway both east and west of Chillicothe, Missouri, Thursday morning after floodwaters covered the road, according to the Missouri Highway Patrol.

U.S. 65 south of Chillicothe also was closed. Meanwhile, U.S. 36 was open west of Macon, Missouri, but traffic was head-to-head and the highway could close if water continued to rise.

The highways were the latest to close in Missouri because of flooding.

“By the looks of the current MoDOT travel map, Missouri is closed!” Troop B of the Missouri Highway Patrol joked on social media. “It is really important to check your route before traveling & exercise patience.”

Emergency responders have performed water rescues across Troop B’s jurisdiction in northeastern Missouri because vehicles were stranded in floodwaters, the highway patrol said.

Record river flooding was occurring in the north of the state on the Missouri River and on the Grand, Chariton, 102 and Platte rivers because of recent heavy rain, according to the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill. Other rivers were experiencing moderate flooding.

“Most areas have received 200-400% above normal precipitation for the month!!” the weather service said on Twitter. “Our scale doesn’t go above 8” above normal but places like Milan, MO are 18” above normal!”

Amtrak’s Missouri River Runner train service has been suspended through June 2 because of flooding and rail congestion. Replacement buses will provide passenger service.

With every rain, Tuttle Creek Lake near Manhattan, Kansas, creeps up to its record level set in 1993. At that time the Corps of Engineers had to release water from the lake which added more water to an already flooded Missouri River Basin.

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Robert A. Cronkleton gets up very early in the morning to bring readers breaking news about crime, transportation and weather at the crack of dawn. He’s been at The Star since 1987 and now contributes data reporting and video editing.

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