National

Lawmakers want Mizzou professor fired for blocking media from covering protest

University of Missouri faculty, students try to block media from covering protests

Students form a perimeter around the #ConcernedStudent1950 tent village and ask media to leave in November. Freelance photographer Tim Tai was firm in stating his First Amendment rights. Communications faculty member Melissa Click asks for 'muscle
Up Next
Students form a perimeter around the #ConcernedStudent1950 tent village and ask media to leave in November. Freelance photographer Tim Tai was firm in stating his First Amendment rights. Communications faculty member Melissa Click asks for 'muscle

Melissa Click, an MU professor who famously asked for some “muscle” to move a student journalist away from protestors during anti-racism protests in November, must be fired, a group of more than 100 Republicans in the General Assembly demanded Monday.

In a letter to the MU Board of Curators, the lawmakers called for the immediate firing of Click, an assistant communications professor at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

The lawmakers accused Click of grabbing the student journalist’s camera and calling on those around her to bring “some muscle” to remove the photographer and other reporters from the area.

A video featuring her went viral and garnered nationwide attention.

“As a professional representing our university, Click failed to meet the obligation she has to her supervisors, fellow professors, university students, and the taxpayers of Missouri,” the letter said.

Instead of promoting a safe and stable learning environment, Click’s actions “served to inflame an already caustic situation that was clearly out of line.”

Click already has resigned a courtesy appointment at MU’s School of Journalism. But the lawmakers want her gone altogether.

Her actions amounted to a “completely disregard for the First Amendment rights of reporters,” the letter said.

It was signed by more than 100 House members and 18 senators.

MU reportedly isn’t commenting, referring to the matter as a personnel issue.

Students form a perimeter around the #ConcernedStudent1950 tent village and ask media to leave in November. Freelance photographer Tim Tai was firm in stating his First Amendment rights. Communications faculty member Melissa Click asks for 'muscle

  Comments