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Cannondale bikes recalled after broken forks result in serious injuries and one death

What to do if you think you have a recalled product

There are many numbers and dates on the foods, drugs, cosmetics, and other products we use every day. When unsafe products must be removed from the market, these numbers and dates can help identify them quickly.
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There are many numbers and dates on the foods, drugs, cosmetics, and other products we use every day. When unsafe products must be removed from the market, these numbers and dates can help identify them quickly.

A cyclocross racing bike must handle roads and bumpy off-roads. So, parts breaking in motion can bring the most serious consequences, which is why Cycling Sports Group recalled about 11,600 Connondale CAADX cyclocross bikes in the U.S. and Canada.

The exact problem, as stated by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recall notice: “The fork can break, posing a fall hazard with the risk of death and serious injury.”

And, that’s not an overstated risk, according to what Cycling Sports Group told the CPSC. Among the 11 incidents worldwide of broken forks, seven “resulted in serious injuries, including concussions and a spinal injury, and there was one fatality.”

Cannondale’s announcement of the recall reminds riders of the Bicycle Product Suppliers Association standard warning: “A crash or other impact can put extraordinary stress on bicycle components, causing them to fatigue prematurely. Components suffering from stress fatigue can fail suddenly and catastrophically, causing loss of control, serious injury or death.”

This recall covers CAADX bikes with disc brakes from 2013 through 2016. They retailed between $1,000 and $2,200.

Cycling Sports Group is offering repair, not a refund. The company wants customers to take the bike to a Cannondale dealer for a free replacement full carbon fork, “providing increased performance at a lower weight than the original fork,” the Cannondale website says.

To find a dealer, click here. To ask questions, call 844-370-1536, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Eastern time, or email support@cyclincsportsgroup.com.

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Since 1989, David J. Neal’s domain at the Miami Herald has expanded to include writing about Panthers (NHL and FIU), Dolphins, old school animation, food safety, fraud, naughty lawyers, bad doctors and all manner of breaking news. He drinks coladas whole. He does not work Indianapolis 500 Race Day.
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