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A student thought he was getting a ticket. Instead, he got the help he needed.

Police officer helps driver with tie instead of giving him a speeding ticket

Menomonie Police Officer Martin Folczyk spotted a BMW speeding and pulled over the driver. The driver, a University of Wisconsin-Stout student, explained that he was trying to get help with tying his necktie before a presentation. That's when the
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Menomonie Police Officer Martin Folczyk spotted a BMW speeding and pulled over the driver. The driver, a University of Wisconsin-Stout student, explained that he was trying to get help with tying his necktie before a presentation. That's when the

He was a college student on the way to a presentation with one problem – he didn’t know how to tie a necktie.

Some might have looked up a how-to on the internet and done the best they could, but Trevor Keeney, a University of Wisconsin-Stout student, said he had a friend he knew could do it well. So he rushed to the friend’s house before the presentation, but had to keep driving when he discovered he wasn’t home.

Officer Martin Folczyk spotted Keeney’s BMW speeding near the house around 9 a.m. and pulled him over, according to Fox 9. When Folczyk said he was stopping him for speeding and wondered at his erratic driving, Keeney offered his explanation.

“That’s my good friend, and he knows how to tie ties, and I honestly don’t know how to,” Keeney said, according to a dashcam video provided by the Menomonie Police Department.

Folczyk asked for Keeney’s tie, who pulled it from his backpack and handed it over. The officer then looped it around his own neck and started tying it.

“While I do this, why don’t you grab your proof of insurance and your driver’s license real quick,” Folczyk said. “Probably not the best knot, but it will work.”

Keeney gave Folczyk the documents, who handed the tie back for the student to adjust to his own neck. Folczyk knotted the tie another time to make sure it adjusted well on the student’s neck.

“Better than what I was going to do,” Keeney said. “Thank you so much.”

Folczyk let Keeney off with a verbal warning. Keeney told ABC News he ended up getting a 92 percent on the presentation.

The Menomonie police chief later invited Keeney to the station for a lesson on tying on necktie so he wouldn’t get into that situation again.

“I went back and met with him for about 30 minutes and he taught me,” Keeney told ABC News. “It was cool.”

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