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Vendor sold $28 bottles of hot dog water to prove a point. And people drank it up

Vendor Douglas Bevans sold $38 Canadian ($28 US) bottles of hot dog water at Vancouver's Car Free Day festival to prove how vulnerable people are to "health-quackery product marketing." He sold 60 bottles, likening the taste to yoga-class perspiration.
Vendor Douglas Bevans sold $38 Canadian ($28 US) bottles of hot dog water at Vancouver's Car Free Day festival to prove how vulnerable people are to "health-quackery product marketing." He sold 60 bottles, likening the taste to yoga-class perspiration. Twitter/@BarstoolNate

Douglas Bevans relished the chance to sell his product as a vendor at the Car Free Day festival in Vancouver, British Columbia over the weekend.

He had glass bottles full of water - each with an organic beef hot dog bobbing inside.

The sign in the booth hawked "Hot Dog Water unfiltered" and listed health benefits: Lose weight, increase brain function, look younger, increase vitality. It's keto compatible, too, the sign said.

Each bottle cost $37.99 Canadian ($28 American), but a Father's Day special meant two could be had for $75.

Bevans manned the booth wearing a hot dog costume, identifying himself as the CEO of Hot Dog Water, CTV reported.

What people didn't know is that Bevans knew the water, in which he boiled about 100 of those organic wienies, according to CTV, kinda tasted like yoga-class perspiration.

"If you’re at a yoga class, your perspiration is actually pretty close to the makeup of the Hot Dog Water," he told USA Today.

People were so very confused.

But they bought the water anyway, about 60 bottles of it.

“They’ve been drinking it for hours,” Bevans told Global News the day of the festival. “We have gone through about 60 liters of real hot dog water.”

People who read the fine print on the bottle labels learned that hot dog water isn't really a health elixir. It was just Bevans trying to make a point about consumerism, marketing and how vulnerable people can be to a good pitch, especially when it comes to products said to be backed by science.

Said the label, according to USA Today: "Hot Dog Water in its absurdity hopes to encourage critical thinking related to product marketing and the significant role it can play in our purchasing choices.”

"With clicks, likes, and social media combined with pseudoscience, we are particularly vulnerable when it comes to our purchases," he told USA Today.

According to Global News, Bevans is a performance artist and a tour operator who created hot dog water as a comment on "health-quackery product marketing."

According to CTV he told customers that the lip balm he made from the water would make crow's feet disappear.

"We noticed that some people were rubbing lip balm on their crow's feet and they were swearing their crow's feet were disappearing before their eyes," he told CTV.

It was an unprofitable stunt that cost him about $1,200 for the bottles, labels, branding, the hot dogs and other costs, Bevans told Global News, but he suggested it had other worth.

“From the responses, I think people will actually go away and reconsider some of these other $80 bottles of water that will come out that are ‘raw’ or ‘smart waters,’ or anything that doesn’t have any substantial scientific backing but just a lot of pretty impressive marketing," he told Global News.



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