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This boy hated his salad so much he called 911 twice, and the Mounties showed up

A 12-year-old boy in Halifax, Nova Scotia, didn't like the salad his parent made him so he called 911 – twice. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police used the unusual case to encourage parents to talk to their children about using 911 correctly.
A 12-year-old boy in Halifax, Nova Scotia, didn't like the salad his parent made him so he called 911 – twice. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police used the unusual case to encourage parents to talk to their children about using 911 correctly. tljungblad@kcstar.com

This is not what "food police" means, not even in Canada.

Last week, just before 10 p.m. on Tuesday, a 12-year-old Canadian boy was so unhappy with the salad one of his parents made for him that he called 911, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reports.

Then he called 911 again to make it clear that he really didn't like that salad — and to ask where the police were.

Boy, were his parents surprised when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police showed up at the door.

"He didn’t like what was in his salad," Cpl. Dal Hutchinson of the Halifax District Royal Canadian Mounted Police told "Inside Edition."

"Parents were not impressed. The 12-year-old boy, well, he was not aware that this was not an acceptable reason to call 911."

But it's not just kids who are confused about how to use 911, Hutchinson told the CBC. The Mounties in Nova Scotia, he said, get non-emergency calls to the emergency line every day, like the call from one parent complaining about a child's haircut.

He told "Inside Edition" of a man who called the Mounties because he missed his ride home from bingo.

"We can't make this stuff up," he told the CBC.

People can get fined about $700 for misusing the line, according to the Mounties.

"We frequently receive 911 calls from impaired people — I’ve attended some where people have misplaced their television remote and want police to find it," Hutchinson told Inside Edition. "Sometimes we do (find it), sometimes we don’t find it. However, some cases, we have left them with the fine."

In salad boy's case, given his age and the discussion officers had with him about how to use 911 correctly, Hutchinson told the CBC he would not be fined.

The Nova Scotia police posted a reminder on their Facebook page to parents to talk to their kids about how to use 911 after the incident.

“While many can relate to the dislike of a salad at times, this raises a more important issue that warrants discussion at all ages,” Hutchinson said in the post.

"The improper use of 911 is an issue with all age groups and it ties up valuable resources, preventing emergency first responders from dealing with real emergencies.”

Of course, reporters left no lettuce leaf unturned and had to ask: Just what kind of salad was it?

"Obviously one to his dislike because he called 911," Hutchinson told the CBC.

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