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Gun-toting Kent State grad wants to arm wrestle Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg

Kaitlin Bennett, a Kent State University graduate who found Internet fame by carrying an AR-10 around campus after graduation, has challenged Parkland shooting survivor and gun control advocate David Hogg to an arm wrestling match.
Kaitlin Bennett, a Kent State University graduate who found Internet fame by carrying an AR-10 around campus after graduation, has challenged Parkland shooting survivor and gun control advocate David Hogg to an arm wrestling match. Twitter

Kaitlin Bennett, the Kent State University graduate who found Internet fame by carrying an AR-10 around campus after graduation, has challenged Parkland shooting survivor and gun control advocate David Hogg to arm wrestle.

Bennett tweeted at Hogg on Sunday, the day he graduated from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, where 17 people died in a mass shooting at the school in February. Four of the victims would have graduated on Sunday.

"I have a challenge for you @davidhogg111," Bennett tweeted.. "Let's arm wrestle. If I win, we get to keep the 2nd amendment. If you win, we turn in our guns. Deal?"

She followed up by posting a photo of Hogg and tweeting: "It's alright guys, the 2nd amendment is safe," and later referred to him as "twig arms."

Hogg, 18, has not responded to the challenge.

Bennett, 22, from Zanesville, Ohio, led gun-rights activities when she was at Kent State — where students are not allowed to carry on campus — and became famous after she posed for photos around campus with an AR-10 strapped to her back last month after graduation.

New Kent State grad made headlines after sharing photos of herself on campus with an AR-10 rifle. The Twitter photos went viral and stirred controversy over campus carry laws.

She founded the Kent State chapter of the conservative group Liberty Hangout, which calls itself a "growing libertarian media outlet which brings readers relevant insight into current events & promotes Austrian economics & property rights."

Hogg and some of his fellow Parkland survivors have announced a 60-day, 20-state, 75-stop summer bus tour called "March for Our Lives: Road to Change," to register young people to vote and to promote gun law reform.

After graduation on Sunday, Hogg told ABC News he will continue to work toward common-sense gun regulations.

“I'm gonna be taking a gap year and not going to college for a year so that I can continue to work on these issues and promote sensible legislation, for example — not just around gun control, but around youth voter turnout,” he told "Nightline."

After she graduated last month, Bennett told media she planned to stay in the area around Kent State to work with the campus gun-rights group she founded. “If students thought my political activism at Kent will be over now that I have graduated, they are wrong,” she told Campus Reform.

On Tuesday morning, in an apparent case of swatting, an anonymous caller called 911 to report that there was someone with a weapon inside Hogg's home in Florida. SWAT teams and officers in tactical gear responded to the false call, according to the Broward County Sheriff’s Office.

No one was home at the time. Hogg and his family were in Washington, D.C., where he received the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award at the Kennedy Center.

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