The Buzz

TheChat: Lessons were learned in the battle over national health care

Blunt
Blunt

Good morning.

▪ “Surely one of the great lessons to learn here is you need to do whatever is necessary to get some people’s views from the other side into what you are doing so that they buy into what you are doing.” — Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt, a Republican, in the wake of the Senate vote to repeal Obamacare.

Blunt makes a lot of sense here. Six years after the Affordable Care Act was passed, Republicans continue to fight the legislation. That might not have been the case had Democrats found ways to win over a few Republicans when the bill passed. Democrats might say that wasn’t going to happen under any circumstances. Still, a bill with even a slight bipartisan tinge would have changed things. (link via johncombest.com).

▪ “In my experience, politicians make the best politicians.” — author Joe Klein on whether Missouri GOP gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens would be a good governor.

Klein, a Time Magazine columnist, focuses extensively, and very positively, on Greitens in his new book “Charlie Mike.” Greitens is a newcomer to politics, so Klein was expressing doubts. But in a KCUR interview he added that the talented Greitens could be the exception to the rule.

▪ “Shortchanging 50 percent of the workforce is bad for women, it’s bad for families, and it’s bad for our entire economy.” — Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon explaining why he signed an executive order mandating that state agencies eliminate the gender pay gap.

Nixon took the action in Kansas City. “Equal work,” he said, “deserves equal pay – period.”

▪ “I've heard other campaigns going out there. They’re fighting for delegates.” — Kansas GOP executive director Clay Barker on the news that Donald Trump consultant Alan Cobb, a former Kansas director of Americans for Prosperity, was dispatched to the Virgin Islands and American Samoa in a bid to line up support.

That’s because of a national convention rule that blocks the nomination of candidates who fail to win a majority of delegates in eight states or territories. Not a bad trip for Cobb, though.

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