The Buzz

TheChat: Sen. Roy Blunt paints a grim view of threats facing America

Blunt
Blunt

Good morning.

▪ “More prevalent, more complex and potentially more catastrophic than ever before.” — Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt, a Republican, describing the threats facing the U.S. these days.

Speaking in Fulton, Blunt said laws aimed at defending the country, including the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and the Patriot Act, should be allowed to expire. Of the Iranian nuclear deal, Blunt said other Middle Eastern nations now will pursue nuclear weapons. “What this agreement really does is let the nuclear genie out of the bottle,” he said. (link via johncombest.com).

▪ “Those on that side never even got close to the number necessary to get it on the ballot.” — Lt. Jason Grellner of the Missouri Narcotics Officers Association downplaying talk that the release of Jeff Mizanskey, who had been serving life in Missouri prison on marijuana charges, would lead to more relaxed dope laws in the state.

Grellner was referring to past citizen-initiative efforts to get the legalization issue on the ballot. What’s really needed, he added, is better treatment programs for addicts.

▪ “Failed to hold anyone accountable for the waste of taxpayer dollars.” — Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat, writing about the military’s response to construction of a headquarters in Afghanistan that was never used and was built over the objections of the top general in charge.

McCaskill wants to know why the Pentagon has never taken action against military officials who built a 64,000-square foot command and control facility at Camp Leatherneck in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. It cost between $25 million and $36 million.

▪ “There’s a fuse burning, and things are going to blow up soon. It’s not if it will blow up. The only question is when.” — a GOP lawmaker close to U.S. House Republican leaders.

The issue is the future of House Speaker John Boehner who faces big questions about how to address impending votes on a government shutdown. Conservatives may stage another revolt against the veteran GOP leader.

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