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TheChat: George W. Bush points to one big problem facing his brother’s presidential bid — himself

Bush
Bush

Happy Friday.

▪ “Me.” — former President George W. Bush describing one big problem that his brother has as he seeks the presidency.

The former president acknowledged that a lot of people believe the country has had enough Bushes. “That’s why you won’t see me out there, and he doesn’t need to defend me, and he’s totally different from me,” Bush said. He added that Jeb Bush would be a “damn good president.”

▪ “It is unconscionable that Americans who inherit the family farm or small business are forced to sell their land or business because they cannot afford to pay death taxes.” — Missouri Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler, a Harrisonville Republican, on her vote to repeal the death tax.

Right now, the tax applies only to estate transfers in excess of $5.4 million for individuals and $10.9 million for couples. Less than one-half of one percent of Americans could be affected. That caused Democrats to say this is another boost to the rich. The cost to the treasury: $269 billion over a decade. Hartzler didn’t explain how that amount would be covered.

▪ “We will not see presidential candidates coming here for votes, but they will be coming here for some of the talent in our state and probably more importantly, to raise funds.” — Missouri Republican consultant James Harris on the state’s role in the 2016 presidential race.

With the state tilting Republican all the time, don’t expect heavy presidential campaigning here. But the March primary may draw GOP candidates, and some believe that key Democrats are urging Hillary Clinton to campaign in the state as part of an appeal to the Heartland.

▪ “Put your pen where your mouth is.” — a protest sign at an event that Gov. Sam Brownback attended aimed at highlighting child abuse prevention efforts in Kansas.

Demonstrators showed up outside the Capitol Thursday where the event was held to protest the governor’s decision to sign new welfare restrictions into law earlier in the day.

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