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Replay: Missouri and Kansas Republicans and Democrats analyze the first Trump-Clinton debate

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, stands with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at the first presidential debate at Hofstra University, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, in Hempstead, N.Y.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, stands with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at the first presidential debate at Hofstra University, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, in Hempstead, N.Y. AP

For the record, let’s note that sports metaphors don’t work for politics. After the whole win-or-lose thing, they fall apart. Standing on a stage and debating nuclear proliferation and universal health care is nothing like smacking a 95-mph fastball, hitting a receiver on a button route or running a good pick-and-roll.

But let us never pass on the chance at an Ali-Frazier reference.

Perhaps not since the Louisville Lip got put on the canvas by Smoking Joe has the world been so interested, been rooting so passionately for somebody to take a stiff hook to the jaw, been analyzing the match-ups so endlessly in the weeks, days and hours before the bell rang.

If you’re of a certain age, you cheered for Ali and Frazier, and that told people something about you. Likewise, joining Team Hillary or Team Donald (more accurately #NeverTrump or #NotAnotherClinton) reveals a telling part of who you are today.

Ali and Frazier met three times, culminating in the Thrilla in Manila (in the spirit of fact-checking, it should be noted said fight did not take place in Manila) that nearly killed them both. It saw both fighters elevated by the effort — even if less of each was left after the fight. Frazier won the first (like tonight’s debate, in New York state). Unlike this first debate — showing on multiple networks and available to stream — you had to pay to see a closed circuit broadcast or satisfy yourself with radio reports that spilled out after every round. Ali took the first rematch and the final match in the Philippines.

Clinton-Trump promises to be a trilogy as well, with a Kaine-Pence undercard stuck in the middle. On paper, the bout holds promise because the contestants bring such wildly different styles. As James Fallows put it in The Atlantic: “Right brain versus left brain; gut versus any portion of the brain at all; impulse versus calculation; id versus superego; and of course man versus woman.”

With this showdown, people will be scoring from home, primarily through their Twitter accounts. We’ve created a live feed of pols and their people from both parties in Missouri and Kansas.

Now head to your corners and come out punching.

Live Blog Missouri and Kansas Republicans and Democrats on the Trump/Clinton Debate
 
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