The Buzz

TheChat: Out-of-staters spend big on Eric Greitens

Greitens
Greitens

Good morning.

▪ “Eric Greitens has now received more than $10 million from out-of-state contributors — the most out-of-state campaign cash ever spent on a single race in Missouri.” — Andrew Whalen, campaign manager for Missouri Democratic gubernatorial candidate Chris Koster, in an email fundraising appeal Tuesday.

The Koster campaign claims that money from “DC special interests and out-of-state billionaires” make up 70 percent of Greitens’ campaign fundraising. “Eric Greitens isn’t ashamed of his base of support outside Missouri,” Whalen wrote.

▪ "Voters will be left with no doubt that Jason Kander is a loyal Hillary Clinton partisan.” — a Republican source telling Politico that Republicans are gearing up for a million-dollar-plus ad buy targeting Missouri Democratic Senate candidate Jason Kander in the days ahead.

The news comes on the heels of some buzz from Democrats who plan to spend another $2 million on Kander’s behalf. The GOP plan: Tie Kander to Clinton. Bottom line: A TON of money is going to be spent on this race, which is seen as close.

▪ “We don’t have that anymore.” — former Missouri state Auditor and Democratic Party chair Susan Montee pointing out that when Mel Carnahan was governor, the Democrats had a terrific get-out-the-vote operation. But that, she said, is no longer the case.

Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon has been roundly criticized for not focusing more on party needs.

▪ “The remarkable aspect of the new Morning Consult poll is that Governor Brownback is less popular than governors in states who are struggling with serious controversies.” — Bob Beatty, a political science professor at Washburn University in Topeka, on a new survey that showed Brownback retaining his standing as the nation’s least popular governor.

Kansas probably qualifies as a state that’s dealing with serious controversies, given its budget problems. Still, Brownback’s national standing is something to behold and is probably unprecedented in Kansas history.

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