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TheChat: Missouri state senator will stay seated during Pledge

Sen. Jamilah Nasheed joins Colin Kaepernick in protest during Missouri veto session

Sen. Jamilah Nasheed of St. Louis refused to stand during the Pledge of Allegiance in the Missouri Senate Wednesday in solidarity with NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.
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Sen. Jamilah Nasheed of St. Louis refused to stand during the Pledge of Allegiance in the Missouri Senate Wednesday in solidarity with NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Good afternoon:

▪ “I love America, but I want to support a brother who is shining a light on injustice.” — Missouri state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, a St. Louis Democrat, telling the Post-Dispatch that she’ll sit when her colleagues rise to recite the Pledge of Allegiance.

The brother she refers to is 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick who’s been kneeling during the singing of the national anthem.

▪ “We’d have to have pretty significant growth to start releasing. I think we will be pretty conservative.” — Missouri budget director Dan Haug casting doubt on whether any of the $115 million in spending that Gov. Jay Nixon has withheld will be released this year.

Growth just hasn’t been strong enough to justify the release of the funds, Haug said. (link via johncombest.com).

▪ “The state has made it impossible for me to do my job.” — Michael Barrett, director of Missouri’s public defender system, complaining about the lack of state funding for his program.

Barrett stood by as Nixon cut a $4.5 million budget increase to $1 million. Barrett staged a high-profile protest, demanding that Nixon take one of his cases, which wound up backfiring on him. But as his comments suggest, he’s not backing down.

▪ “There wasn’t any evidence our law had a depressing effect. We had a gain in election security with no cost, empirically, in people participating in our election. On balance, I’d say the effect has been positive.” — Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach on the voting law changes he’s instituted, including a requirement of a photo ID to cast a ballot.

His opponent at a Dole Institute of Politics forum, lawyer Mark Johnson, suggested otherwise, saying anytime you create a hurdle, “you lose people.”

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