Eyewitness

‘Euphoria’ as students experience art with hands instead of eyes at Nelson-Atkins

A group of students from Alphapointe Association for the blind experienced three-dimensional art while wearing white cotton gloves at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.
A group of students from Alphapointe Association for the blind experienced three-dimensional art while wearing white cotton gloves at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. deulitt@kcstar.com

On a chilly February evening at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, a group of students from Alphapointe Association for the Blind and their guides were afforded special access to three-dimensional art while wearing white cotton gloves and experiencing sculptures with their hands, painting personal impressions in their minds.

Led by museum docents giving historical background to the art, the tactile tour, a feature of the museum since 2005, examines a series of human figure sculptures by touch, discussing what each sculpture portrays. Examining the textures, shapes and facial expressions of each piece give each student an appreciation of the creative forms.

Reservations for the Tactile Tour, which lasts about 90 minutes, are required and can be made at 816-751-1ART and at the museum.

During a "Tactile Tour" at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, a group of blind and visually impaired children with Alphapointe were afforded special access to the three-dimensional art while wearing gloves and experiencing sculptures with their hand

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