Crime

Kansas man deported after ex-girlfriend reports him to ICE

Interviews in small Kansas towns reveal that stricter enforcement by ICE has driven many immigrants to fear contact with police, schools and other institutions that they previously trusted, a KU study noted.
Interviews in small Kansas towns reveal that stricter enforcement by ICE has driven many immigrants to fear contact with police, schools and other institutions that they previously trusted, a KU study noted. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Serafin Alegria-Zamora's attorney called it a "final act of terror" when an ex-girlfriend reported the Mexican national to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

That led to the Kansas man's deportation on Friday, according to his attorney, Rekha Sharma-Crawford. His deportation was executed over Sharma-Crawford's complaint stating her client should have been granted a special visa for crime victims.

Alegria-Zamora's application for the visa, known as a "U" visa, had been pending for about four months when he was deported.

Alegria-Zamora, 37, had recently started a family with another woman. His 5-month-old son and common-law wife remain in the U.S.

He was the alleged victim of stalking by his ex-girlfriend — a crime that qualifies for the special visa.

Sharma-Crawford filed an emergency complaint Friday in U.S. District Court in Kansas, but that failed to prevent Alegria-Zamora's deportation.

According to the complaint, Alegria-Zamora was terrorized by his ex-girlfriend, whose "dark obsession" with him became apparent when he began seeing a new woman, who would become the mother of his son.

The ex-girlfriend sent a photo of the new woman with a bull's-eye in the middle of her forehead; sent photos of dead children; and, after Alegria-Zamora's common-law wife became pregnant, the couple received a package containing a doll "drenched in red paint with a note that said, 'back off bitch, Serafin is mine,' " according to the complaint.

Alegria-Zamora has never seen his newborn son due to his detainment.

After his ex-girlfriend reported him, Alegria-Zamora was convicted of illegal re-entry into the U.S. and misuse of a social security number in Wichita.

"It is his only criminal history," Sharma-Crawford wrote.

Note: This story has been updated to reflect that the couple's child is a son. The original lawsuit mistakenly called the child a daughter.



Protesters gathered on the Country Club Plaza upset with President Trump's executive action to end DACA, the Obama-era program which allowed undocumented immigrants brought to this country as children to stay without fear of deportation.

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