Cass County News

Harrisonville is correcting financial problems found in state audit, report says

“I commend the work the city has done so far to correct the problems of the past and more effectively manage taxpayer dollars in the future,” State Auditor Nicole Galloway said in a press release of the improvements Harrisonville has made.
“I commend the work the city has done so far to correct the problems of the past and more effectively manage taxpayer dollars in the future,” State Auditor Nicole Galloway said in a press release of the improvements Harrisonville has made. The Star

Harrisonville is making progress on issues uncovered in a 2017 state audit, according to a report from State Auditor Nicole Galloway.

The 2017 citizen-requested state audit found the city was overextended on taxing district projects and not adequately tracking city finances. The audit found financial management issues and lack of accountability in redevelopment and revitalization projects that depend on revenue from both Transportation Development Districts (TDDs) and Tax Increment Financing Districts (TIFs).

Of 17 findings reviewed in the progress report, 11 were implemented. Five were partially implemented or in progress. One was not implemented. The city has not approved any new incentives since May 2017.

City leaders are in the process of developing better procedures to account for remaining debt on existing projects and have filled vacant positions on the TIF Commission. The city is also in compliance with public meetings and annual reports required by law.

“I commend the work the city has done so far to correct the problems of the past and more effectively manage taxpayer dollars in the future,” Galloway said in a press release.

The review also found that the city is no longer using restricted utility funds to pay for road improvements on a separate TDD project, and repaid money previously loaned from the utility account, with interest.

The city has also updated its purchasing policy to ensure bids are solicited appropriately, change orders are properly approved and purchase orders are maintained for all goods and services.

Raymore City Council filing

Candidate filings for Raymore mayor and city council will begin Tuesday, Dec. 11, for the April 2, 2019 municipal election. The mayoral term is three years. Each city council position is a two-year term. Filings close Tuesday, Jan. 15. Declaration of candidacy can be made from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the City Clerk’s office in Raymore City Hall. A $20 filing fee is required. To learn more, visit www.Raymore.com/CityClerk.

Harrisonville City Council filing

Harrisonville will begin accepting filing for city council applicants on Dec. 11. Candidates present on that day will receive numbers corresponding to their place in line when the city hall doors open at 8 a.m. All others will receive a number based on the order they arrive later in the day or later in the filing process. Names will appear on the ballot in the order of the candidate number issued.

Candidates are required to fill out the appropriate paperwork in the presence of the city clerk, or will forfeit their candidate number. Filing will close on Jan. 15 at 5 p.m.

New phase of Westbrook in Raymore

The Raymore Planning Commission will consider a request from Cooper Land Development for final plat approval on the 15th phase of Westbrook at Creekmoor. The 26-lot single-family subdivision is proposed for land located west of Creekmoor Drive and north of Rannoch Lane. The Planning Commission will consider the request on Dec. 18.

Raymore Museum update

donation picture
Mary C. Dobson, president of Peculiar Charitable Foundation, presents a check for $10,000 to Eleanor Kopetsky for the new Raymore Museum, scheduled to open in the spring. Submitted

A $10,000 donation from the Peculiar Charitable Foundation is helping the Raymore Museum move closer to opening its new home.

The museum, which has existed in the basement of the Cullen funeral home since the 1990s, is scheduled to move into a larger permanent location on South Washington in a house the organization purchased in 2017. The group is renovating the home and outbuildings to make space to display many of the 40,000 artifacts it curates related to the history of Raymore. The new space is expected to open in spring of 2019.

The Raymore Historical Society is accepting donations through Dec. 31 toward the museum project. Donations of more than $50 will be honored on a plaque in the new museum.

Belton oversight volunteers sought

A new Public Safety Sales Tax Oversight Committee is forming in connection with the 1/2-cent public safety sales tax passed Nov. 6. The committee will include five Belton citizens, representatives from the city council, fire and police departments. Volunteer applicants are needed for the citizen positions.

Applications can be submitted until 5 p.m. Dec. 17. For questions or to receive an application, call 816-331-4331 or e-mail admin@belton.org

  Comments