Cass County Democrat Missourian

Raymore-Peculiar High School students have been selected for the All-State Choir

Members of the 2018-19 yearbook staff at Raymore-Peculiar High School included (front row, from left) Maddyson Berg, Grace Rogers, Sydney Bearden, Bela Torres, Kenzie Jones, Byron King and Kaylee Ohlson. (Second row) Savannah Wolff, Hannah Schulze, Bella Gardiner, Jennifer Aguilar, Martha Campos, Victoria Gloeckler and Emma Snider. And (back row) Taylor Catlett, Maddie Young, Marlon Williams, Samantha Como, Sydnie Stewart, Jack Patton and Hannah Baillie.
Members of the 2018-19 yearbook staff at Raymore-Peculiar High School included (front row, from left) Maddyson Berg, Grace Rogers, Sydney Bearden, Bela Torres, Kenzie Jones, Byron King and Kaylee Ohlson. (Second row) Savannah Wolff, Hannah Schulze, Bella Gardiner, Jennifer Aguilar, Martha Campos, Victoria Gloeckler and Emma Snider. And (back row) Taylor Catlett, Maddie Young, Marlon Williams, Samantha Como, Sydnie Stewart, Jack Patton and Hannah Baillie.

Ray-Pec sends 7 singers to All-State Choir

Seven Raymore-Peculiar High School students have been selected for the All-State Choir in Missouri.

They are All-State sopranos Chloe Coons and Payton Ballinger; All-State basses Austin Planker and Robbie Keays; All-State tenor Samuel Reicher; Mark Moorhead, 1st alternate tenor, and Carinne Williams, 2nd alternate soprano.

Thirty-eight Ray-Pec singers participated in the West Central District Honors Choirs on Oct. 12 in Oak Grove. Juniors and seniors participating in the All-District Choir also auditioned for All-State Choir. For the second consecutive year, Ray-Pec took home more All-State honors than any other school in the district, claiming seven of the 24 spots.

HHS names October Students of the Month

Seniors Jessi Buerge and Brodie Rogers are the October Students of the Month at Harrisonville High School. The faculty selected them for their citizenship, leadership, scholarship and sportsmanship.

Buerge is the daughter of Kevin and Diane Buerge. At school, she serves as secretary for Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD), the Key Club and the National Honor Society.

She’s also involved in Traction, a teen driver safety initiative sponsored by the Missouri Department of Transportation. She’s made the Principal’s honor roll for three years, and received letters in academics and boys’ soccer management. Buerge, who likes to travel and play soccer, plans to major in early childhood education at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville.

Rogers, the son of Phil and Jennifer Rogers, plans to study physical education after high school and earn a teaching certificate. He has earned All-Conference honors in football and basketball and All-District in football. He’s also part of the football leadership council.

Outside of school, Rogers likes to play golf and tennis, listen to music and watch football or the TV series “Big Brother” with his parents.

It’s a great pumpkin, for sure

The grandfather of a Harrisonville Elementary School second-grader grew a 1,798-pound pumpkin that set a state record, and students at the school got to see it up close this fall.

The pumpkin grower was Richard Bottorf of Republic, Mo., whose granddaughter is Lilli Bottorf. Students touched the huge pumpkin and learned how it was grown.

Ray-Pec yearbook deemed in top 1%

Last year’s Ray-Pec High School yearbook earned the All-Missouri Award, given to the top 1% of yearbooks in the state by the Missouri Interscholastic Press Association. Editors of the 2018-2019 yearbook were Sydney Bearden, a 2019 graduate, and Kenzi Jones, who is now a senior.

Yearbooks are judged by industry professionals from across the country on a 500-point rubric that encompasses coverage, photography, reporting, design and theme development. The Ray-Pec yearbook lost fewer than 20 points overall, earning the school its highest score ever.

Drexel to revamp bus routes

Prompted by an enrollment decline, the Drexel School District will eliminate one of its three bus routes on Nov. 12, saving roughly $4,000 a month.

“We currently have one route that transports six or seven students on a regular basis, while the other routes consistently have 22-25 and 32-34 riders respectively,” Superintendent Terry Mayfield wrote in a letter to parents.

K-12 enrollment in the southwest Cass County district fell from 312 last year to 286 this year. The district enrolled 326 students in 2015.

The change is expected to increase the longest one-way trip time, for the student who is first to be picked up, to about an hour and 15 minutes, Mayfield told parents.

By email, the superintendent gave this breakdown of the current bus system, which costs $4,112.45 a month for each route for a total of $12,337.35 monthly.

Route 1: The longest one-way trip is about 35 minutes on a route that carries 32 to 34 riders. The route averages 24 miles per day for both ways.

Route 2: The longest one-way trip is about an hour and 5 minutes on a route that carries 22 to 25 riders. It averages 67 miles daily for both ways.

Route 3: The longest one-way trip takes about 55 minutes for a route that serves six to seven riders. It averages 65 miles daily for both ways.

“We could potentially realize a savings of one route, and the money from this savings could be put back into the classrooms for the benefit of our students and staff,” he said.

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