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Arts community to salute Platte County’s 175th

Tenley Hansen, with the band Shortleaf, played guitar with fiddle player Michael Fraser (right) at the Platte Landing boat ramp in September during one of Platte County’s 175th anniversary events. A 70-vessel regatta on the Missouri River commemorated the 1850 sinking of the Steamboat Arabia.
Tenley Hansen, with the band Shortleaf, played guitar with fiddle player Michael Fraser (right) at the Platte Landing boat ramp in September during one of Platte County’s 175th anniversary events. A 70-vessel regatta on the Missouri River commemorated the 1850 sinking of the Steamboat Arabia. File photo

Platte County will conclude its 175th anniversary celebration Sunday with arts-related festivities in Platte City.

Here’s a schedule of the free events at Platte County High School, 1501 Branch St.:

▪ 2 p.m.: Viewing of 20 displays of 175th anniversary events, with “show and tell” from the organizers.

▪ 2 p.m.: Visual arts display by Platte County artists titled, “Platte County: 175 Years!” The original art work depicts the spirit of Platte County, past and present.

▪ 3 p.m.: Concert by the Platte County Anniversary Band. The group, a combination of the county’s two community bands from Parkville and Platte City, is conducted by Steve Berg (Parkville) and Gavin Lendt (Platte City).

The concert includes pieces by Missouri composers and features the premiere “The Heart of a Land,” a new work commissioned for the anniversary celebration. It was composed by Platte County native Michael E. Anderson.

The celebration is co-sponsored by Platte City Friends of the Arts, the 175th Anniversary Committee and the Platte County Parks & Recreation Department’s Outreach Grant Program.

Platte County was officially organized on Dec. 31, 1838, as the first county recognized within the Platte Purchase, land in northwest Missouri that the U.S. government purchased from American Indian tribes in 1836.

On Dec. 31 last year, the county began its observance by renaming its courthouse, built in 1866 to replace a wood structure burned during the Civil War, for now-retired Platte County Circuit Judge Owens Lee Hull Jr.

| Elaine Adams, eadams@kcstar.com

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