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'We're going n----- hunting.' Missouri waitress fired after racist Snapchat video

Tabbie Duncan, former waitress in Missouri, was fired from the Social Bar and Grill after a racist Snapchat video surfaced of her riding on a vehicle with men and going 'n-word hunting.' The Air Force is investigating if she is a new recruit.
Tabbie Duncan, former waitress in Missouri, was fired from the Social Bar and Grill after a racist Snapchat video surfaced of her riding on a vehicle with men and going 'n-word hunting.' The Air Force is investigating if she is a new recruit. Screenshot from YouTube

The woman who appeared in a racist Snapchat video about "n----- hunting" might also need to start searching for a new employer, too.

Tabbie Duncan was fired from her job at the Social Bar and Grill in St. Louis, Missouri, after the restaurant posted on Facebook that the "owners have recently become aware of a vile, disgusting, and offensive video made by one of its employees."

Duncan and two other men are sitting on the hood of a car as it drives down a dark country road, the video shows, and the man recording asks "are we going n----- hunting or what?" The now-fired waitress responds "you get them n-----s" and the person behind the camera says "look at my soon-to-be sister-in-law! She looks so pretty."

In the video, which contains offensive and explicit language, Duncan is then seeing smiling at the camera with a beer in her hand.



The restaurant wrote on Facebook that its owners "immediately terminated this employee as soon as they could reach her!"

"The incendiary comments made by this employee absolutely does NOT represent the views, opinions, and policies of Social Bar & Grill and it’s owners," the post read. "Nor will they be tolerated in any fashion. Social Bar & Grill and it’s owners continue to encourage and seek diversity in its restaurant."

Duncan, who is 20, told The New York Daily News that she is "so sorry" for the comments, saying "I was intoxicated."

"I have black friends, I have black people in my family, I didn't mean it," she said. "I didn't know that I was being vidoed."

As reported by Heavy.com, a family member tagged Duncan in a May 31 Facebook post that said she had just joined the U.S. Air Force.

Another Facebook user named Alexis Morris shared the alleged screenshot online.

The official Facebook profile for U.S. Air Force Recruiting responded to the image that was making the rounds on social media.

"We have been made aware of a video online of an alleged reserve Airman who made racially insensitive comments," the comment reads. "We are looking into the matter and we appreciate this being brought to our attention. The U.S. Air Force values diversity and inclusion; our Airmen come together to produce an incredible team that can accomplish any mission and overcome any challenge.

"...We take incidents like this very seriously and action will be taken upon further investigation as necessary."

Rev. Alfonza Seldon, president of the Phenix City-Russell County NAACP, called Monday afternoon for the Phenix City School District to discipline several young men allegedly making racist chants in a video recently published on social media.

Duncan has since deleted her Facebook profile, which had memes supporting President Donald Trump and complaining about NFL players who knelt for the national anthem to protest racial inequality, according to The Riverfront Times. She also posted a Facebook status on Sunday that said "everyone makes, mistakes in life, but that doesn't mean they have to pay for them the rest of their life."

Many online don't seem ready to accept her apology. The Root ran an article that started with "Bye, Tabbie" and dozens of people took to Duncan's Instagram account — where she posted modeling shots — to give them a piece of their mind.

"Man, I sure did have some good times in the Air Force," one user wrote. "However, you'll never get to experience that."

"I hope all these hateful comments get to you," another person commented.

A third user summed it up in a single hashtag: "#kkklasy"

Duncan said she has learned "a lot of lessons" from the experience — and that she "barely knew" the people in the video.

"I didn't mean to hurt anybody, I was drunk," she told The New York Daily News. "I need to seek help."

This video shot from a car carrying two people, including a Korean-American Air Force veteran, shows another driver making racist gestures at them in Fremont, California, in mid-May.

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