Local

Morning Rush: Saber rattling, Guam and Missouri’s B-2s; 1 million visitors for eclipse

Stealth bomber, expensive and deadly

The stealth bomber based near Kansas City is the most expensive plane in history and a powerful part of the Pentagon's ability to strike targets anywhere in the world.
Up Next
The stealth bomber based near Kansas City is the most expensive plane in history and a powerful part of the Pentagon's ability to strike targets anywhere in the world.

Welcome to The Kansas City Star’s Morning Rush, where we get you ready for the day ahead.

Here’s what you need to know:

Missouri’s B-2 bombers

Missouri-based B-2 bombers may play a role should tensions escalate to the point of violence with North Korea, Scott Canon reports. The bat-winged planes cost $2.2 billion each in design, manufacturing and upgrades. There are 20 B-2s in the fleet.

A Kansas City-area store owner from Micronesia shares his thoughts, and those of loved ones living in Guam, on President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un exchanging threats.

Scores of visitors expected for the eclipse

More than a million out-of-state visitors are expected to come to Missouri for the eclipse, Robert A. Cronkleton reports. That could jam up the state’s highway system, so leave early to get to your viewing point in time for the spectacle.

The edge of the eclipse path could be off by as much as a half-mile as it goes through downtown Kansas City, according to eclipse map experts. Satellite image by Google Earth. New map information by John Irwin.

In other eclipse news, the maps of the eclipse’s path are wrong by up to a half-mile, experts say. And some aren’t eagerly anticipating the event; a group of conspiracy theorists are pushing the idea that the eclipse is a portent for the end of the world. (It’s not.)

Quality Hill mansion restored

A mansion originally built in 1887 sits in the oldest residential area in the metro region: Quality Hill. It was restored over 18 months, Cynthia Gregorian reports.

Plagiarism in college leader’s speech?

John Rios, on the board of trustees for the Kansas City Kansas Community College, is accused of plagiarizing the speech of a 2004 Hampton valedictorian, who himself was once accused of ripping off a poet in his speech.

In 2004, Hampton University valedictorian Tim Lee used the poem “The New ABC’s,” by Sherri ScottNovoa, in his commencement speech without attribution. In May, John D. Rios, chairman of Kansas City Kansas Community College, gave an eerily similar c

Editorial: How to fix Kansas prisons

The Star’s editorial board writes that Kansas should call for a special session to address “the growing safety problems in the state’s prisons.”

Max Londberg: 816-234-4378, @MaxLondberg

  Comments