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Morning Rush: Weekend storms, making gun silencers more accessible, Big Slick big bucks

Mike Appleberry looked over the break in his tree limb that fell on his home in the 5800 block of Lowell Street on Sunday in Overland Park after a storm brought high winds, lightning and rain.
Mike Appleberry looked over the break in his tree limb that fell on his home in the 5800 block of Lowell Street on Sunday in Overland Park after a storm brought high winds, lightning and rain. jsleezer@kcstar.com

Welcome to The Kansas City Star’s Morning Rush, where we get you ready for the day ahead.

Here’s what you need to know:

Storms down trees, cause power outages

Thousands of customers were still without power Monday after severe storms swept through the Kansas City area this weekend. KCP&L said that it expected that some customers would be without power into Monday evening, Robert A. Cronkleton, John Sleezer and Matt Campbell report.

Gun silencers

Silencers, also known as suppressors, could be easier to buy under legislation in the U.S. House pushed by the National Rifle Association. Advocates say the devices protect shooters’ hearing, while opponents argue they could make it more difficult for law enforcement to track gunfire, Scott Canon reports.

Mistakes put doppelganger in prison for 17 years

Eyewitness identification is the leading cause of wrongful convictions, Tony Rizzo and Joe Robertson report. Nationwide, of more than 300 wrongful convictions later overturned by DNA evidence, mistaken eyewitness identification played a role in about 71 percent of the cases, according to the Innocence Project. Richard Anthony Jones, who served 17 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit, is the latest example.

Big Slick raises millions

Big Slick Celebrity Weekend has donated more than $4.5 million to the Cancer Center at Children’s Mercy for research and amenities to ease the pain. Where does all the Big Slick money go? A Children’s Mercy doctor and patient explain. Aaron Randle reports as the all-star celebrity weekend returns to KC this weekend.

Opinion: Rename J.C. Nichols fountain?

KC Star editorial board member Steve Kraske argues that at a time when other cities are rethinking how they commemorate their past, Kansas City should reconsider its tribute to J.C. Nichols, a visionary developer who went to great lengths to ensure that racial and religious minorities could not live in his neighborhoods.

Michelle Smith: 816-234-4356, @michellesmithkc

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