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Love Trumps Hate demonstrators march from Union Station to City Hall

Love Trumps Hate: Kansas Citians partake in second anti-Donald Trump march

People gathered at one of several Love Trumps Hate marches nationwide. This one began in Kansas City on the lawn across the street from Union Station and ended peacefully at City Hall, nearly two miles away.
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People gathered at one of several Love Trumps Hate marches nationwide. This one began in Kansas City on the lawn across the street from Union Station and ended peacefully at City Hall, nearly two miles away.

A voice of dissent could be heard through a chorus of anti-Donald Trump chants by a group of protestors gathered Friday near Union Station for a rally to decry the president elect.

Amid a crowd of hundreds, Tony Rice wanted to make a point: He has the right to assemble and have his voice heard just as those involved with the protest.

Rice was there not as an agitator or a supporter of Trump. He was there as — in his words — “a supporter of the country.” He believes the anti-Trump rhetoric is disrespectful to the future commander-in-chief.

“It was an election,” Rice said. “The people spoke. Win or lose, it was decided. All I have heard in the last three days is for everybody to be quiet because somebody else that lost wants to be heard.

“I’ve had my fill of all of that.”

Rice was in the minority at the rally, one of several Love Trumps Hate marches nationwide. It began in Kansas City on the lawn across the street from Union Station and ended peacefully at City Hall.

Rachel Noll, a 25-year-old bartender from Kansas City, held an anti-trump sign at the corner of Pershing Avenue and Main Street near the rally’s starting point. Noll said she was in opposition of some of the stances Trump has publicly taken against immigrants in the country illegally and segments of the minority population.

“I don’t believe in Donald Trump’s message,” Noll said. “All of this is insane, and I am not just going to sit at home while this is happening.”

Paul Richardson of Shawnee is a teacher at Alta Vista High School in Kansas City. The school is predominantly Hispanic and African-American, Richardson said. He believes some of the rhetoric used during Trump’s campaign for office was incendiary.

He marched to show solidarity with some of the students at Alta Vista.

“The effect the election has had on the young people there has been a real eye-opening experience for me,” Richardson said.

Protesters around the country continued to rally and march Friday as they have done daily since Trump’s presidential election victory.

The spirited demonstrations on college campuses and along downtown streets were mostly peaceful following previous outbreaks of window-smashing and fire-setting.

Evening marches disrupted traffic in Miami and Atlanta, while organizers said people gathered on Boston Common in what was billed as a rally for peace and love.

In Chicago, multiple groups planned protests through Saturday.

Demonstrations also were planned Saturday in Las Vegas, Los Angeles and other areas. In Kansas City, another protest is planned for 2 p.m. Saturday at City Hall.

Previous demonstrations drew thousands of people in New York, Los Angeles and other large urban centers. The largely peaceful protests were overshadowed by sporadic episodes of vandalism, violence and street-blocking.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Toriano Porter: 816-234-4779, @torianoporter

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