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Starbucks, AT&T each plan to hire 10,000 veterans and family members

Starbucks and AT said Wednesday that they each plan to hire at least 10,000 veterans and their family members over the next five years.

The coincidental announcements, ahead of Veterans Day on Monday, added the coffee and telecommunication giants to companies that have committed in recent years to increase veteran hiring.

Starbucks, a Seattle-based coffee chain, said it will develop a system dedicated to matching the skills of veterans and military spouses with jobs throughout its organization. Starbucks said it has nearly 200,000 employees worldwide.

Starbucks, which has 20,000 locations, also said it will designate five cafes in military communities where a portion of each transaction is donated to Operations GoodJobs and Vested in Vets.

AT, headquartered in Dallas, said in a news release that it is doubling a hiring goal it set in April with the White House’s Joining Forces Initiative to increase the hiring of veterans. A little more than half of the veterans it has hired this year are technicians, said AT, which is upgrading its broadband networks. AT also said Wednesday that it had in recent weeks announced about 300 job openings in Missouri and Kansas, about 80 in the Kansas City area.

Also in April, AT said it was helping JPMorgan Chase create a job and talent exchange at

www.vtx.jobs

as part of a 121-company effort to hire 100,000 veterans this year. JPMorgan said last week that the companies through the third quarter had already hired 92,869 veterans.

Still, the jobless rate for post-Sept. 11 veterans was 10.1 percent in September, the second straight month of double-digit unemployement for the group, according to the Labor Department’s jobs report.

The unemployment rate for veterans of all generations was 6.5 percent, up from a yearly low in August of 6.2 percent but better than the nationwide 7.2 percent rate.

Earlier this year, the largest retailer, Wal-Mart, said it planned to hire more than 100,000 veterans over the next five years.

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