Health Care

HCA Midwest researcher’s insulin study finds reductions in diabetic emergencies

An unidentified worker checks vials of insulin at the Novo Nordisk factory in Kalundborg, Denmark. A Kansas City-based researcher led a study published this week that found that the company’s new long-acting insulin cut hypoglycemic diabetic emergencies by 40 percent.
An unidentified worker checks vials of insulin at the Novo Nordisk factory in Kalundborg, Denmark. A Kansas City-based researcher led a study published this week that found that the company’s new long-acting insulin cut hypoglycemic diabetic emergencies by 40 percent.

An industry-funded study led by a Kansas City doctor found that a new type of long-acting insulin reduced hypoglycemic diabetic emergencies by 40 percent in people with Type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, can cause seizures and loss of consciousness in severe cases.

Dr. Steven Marso, the medical director of cardiovascular services at HCA Midwest Health, presented the results of the study this week at American Diabetes Association’s 77th Scientific Sessions conference in San Diego. It was also published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study was funded by Novo Nordisk, the maker of insulin degludec, which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in December.

Editor’s note: Dr. Steven Marso and reporter Andy Marso are unrelated.

Andy Marso: 816-234-4055, @andymarso

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