Business

Owner seeks a ‘subtle’ name for his Kansas restaurant. Shocker Knockers is one choice

A new restaurant concept that will feature “skimpy uniforms” is coming to Kansas. Abdul Arif, the businessman behind the idea, created a poll on Facebook to name the restaurants. Options include Shocker Knockers and Busted Bourbons.
A new restaurant concept that will feature “skimpy uniforms” is coming to Kansas. Abdul Arif, the businessman behind the idea, created a poll on Facebook to name the restaurants. Options include Shocker Knockers and Busted Bourbons.

Wichita businessman Abdul Arif says he hopes his new restaurant will be “very subtle” but also similar to Hooters or Twin Peaks.

Shocker Knockers and Perky Jugs are among the names he’s considering.

Arif says he wants his restaurant to appeal to millennials, who are “much more sensitive to sexual nuances.”

“The millennials are much more sophisticated,” he said. “They would be repelled by a very overt message.”

He described his conceptual restaurant as “a sports bar and grill with, ah, skimpy uniforms.

“We’re still searching for the right name to put on there.”

To that end, Arif started a poll on Facebook with name proposals. Those who select the winning name will be entered into a drawing for $1,000 and free beer.

Blonde Bleachers, Cheers Taphouse, Busted Bourbons and Yogies Taphouse are additional proposals. A “yogie” is defined by the Urban Dictionary as someone who eats and sleeps often.

“The restaurant concept is going wild,” Arif said. “At the end of the day, everybody likes to look at pretty girls and drink beer.”

“Those names are terrible,” Glenn Bechtel wrote in a comment. “I was thinking Mammary’s. ... Oh wait too overt for the sophisticated palates that go to places like these.”

As of Tuesday morning, Cheers Taphouse had the most votes, Arif said

A 2017 survey of 250 women who worked in “breastaurants” found the waitresses suffer from a greater risk of developing eating disorders, anxiety and depression.

Some restaurants create grading systems to assess the women who work in them, the survey found.

“We want to raise awareness about the negative impact that these types of restaurant environments may have on female servers,” Dawn Syzmanski, one of two psychology researchers from the University of Tennessee who performed the survey, told USA Today. “We want the public to use this data in personal decisions about whether to support or not support these types of restaurants.”

When asked whether the survey’s results concerned him, Arif said, “No. No, not really because ... we don’t force anybody to work there.”

Arif, who is also a lawyer, said that to avoid gender or appearance discrimination in hiring, his servers will be classified as models under what’s known as the bona fide occupational qualification exception — the same exception to discrimination laws that allows casting directors to recruit, say, a white actor to play George Washington, Arif said.

Since the women at his restaurants will be classified as models, they will earn “well above anything waitresses make.”

He estimated they’ll earn between $700 and $1,000 per week including tips, and he added that a tuition reimbursement program will be granted to employees who earn B’s and above in college.

“We want to encourage these ladies to enhance their full potential,” he said.

He added that he is a “a capitalist to the core, but a capitalist with a social conscience,” and that he’s a founding member of a nonprofit, the Mayflower Clinic, that pays medical expenses for the uninsured.

Arif said he’s not ready to create a restaurant that caters to female clientele rather than men.

“I just don’t think Wichita’s ready for something like that, or there’s not enough segment here maybe,” Arif says. “Of course, we don’t want to be partial, but I just don’t know yet if I’m brave enough to do something like that.”

Arif says he wants women and children to be comfortable coming to his restaurant, regardless of its future name.

“Otherwise, it would look like a strip club, and we don’t want that.”

Look for results of the naming contest by Jan. 15.

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