Business

Cerner offers voluntary separation packages

North Kansas City-based Cerner, which deals in health information technology, now has 21,000 employees systemwide and has said it intends to add tens of thousands more over the next 10 years. The company is one of the largest employers in the Kansas City area.
North Kansas City-based Cerner, which deals in health information technology, now has 21,000 employees systemwide and has said it intends to add tens of thousands more over the next 10 years. The company is one of the largest employers in the Kansas City area. File photo

Cerner Corp. employees whose combination of years of service and age total 65 have been offered voluntary separation packages.

Eligible workers, including former Siemens Health Services employees who became part of Cerner earlier this year, have one month to meet with their managers and decide whether the separation offer works for them.

Cerner spokesman Dan Smith said Tuesday the one-time offer reflects the “deep bench of complementary talent” because of the Siemens acquisition and doesn’t affect Cerner’s continued hiring or growth plans.

The North Kansas City-based company, which deals in health information technology, now has 21,000 employees systemwide and has said it intends to add tens of thousands more over the next 10 years. The company is one of the largest employers in the Kansas City area.

“This is a truly voluntary program for all of our U.S. associates,” Smith said. “There is no predetermined outcome and no number to hit. It provides eligible associates who might be ready to make a change the chance to decide to stay or pursue a different option and get benefits not normally associated with voluntary departures.”

The program was precipitated by the overlap of jobs because of the Siemens’ acquisition but it isn’t necessarily aimed at employees who hold the overlapping jobs.

Employees who take the buyout will get “financial benefits commensurate with their tenure and positions” along with “full vacation payouts and medical benefits,” Smith said.

No involuntary separations are included in the actions, Smith said.

Asked whether the offers could be viewed as age discriminatory, Smith said every employee eligible to consider the buyout had been invited to sit down “one on one with their managers and discuss their choices.”

To reach Diane Stafford, call 816-234-4359 or send email to stafford@kcstar.com. Read more from Diane at kansascity.com/workplace. Twitter: @kcstarstafford.

  Comments