Chow Town

Watch Arthur Bryant’s make its famous saucy burnt ends

On Chow Town Live, Sarah Gish talks burnt ends at Arthur Bryant's

The Star's Sarah Gish and Chow Town Live go to Arthur Bryant's Barbecue, 1727 Brooklyn Ave. in Kansas City, to learn the secrets of the iconic restaurant's mouthwatering 'cue. General manager Willis Simpson demonstrates how he makes burnt ends.
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The Star's Sarah Gish and Chow Town Live go to Arthur Bryant's Barbecue, 1727 Brooklyn Ave. in Kansas City, to learn the secrets of the iconic restaurant's mouthwatering 'cue. General manager Willis Simpson demonstrates how he makes burnt ends.

Who’s hungry for burnt ends?

For our latest installment of Chow Town Live, we visited one of the most famous barbecue restaurants in the world: Arthur Bryant’s, 1727 Brooklyn Ave. in Kansas City.

There, longtime general manager Willis Simpson showed off an oak- and hickory-fueled barbecue smoker that has been in operation since the 1930s. The mouthwatering flavor of Arthur Bryant’s brisket, he said, “is all in the bricks.”

Simpson also demonstrated how he makes burnt ends — a delicacy in Kansas City — by smoking brisket low and slow for 12 hours at 220 degrees. When it’s charred on the outside and juicy on the inside, he trims the fat, slices the brisket into chunks and marinates it in Rich & Spicy sauce. After another three or four hours in the smoker, the burnt ends are fall-apart tender. With a slab of white bread and a few pickles, they’re saucy barbecue bliss.

“Arthur Bryant started burnt ends,” Simpson said on the show. “We do it our way.”

Later on, he sat down with The Star’s Sarah Gish to show off a few other delicacies from the menu: smoked sausage, turkey and, of course, ribs. On the full show, which you can watch here on Facebook, he also explained the differences between Arthur Bryant’s three sauces and talked about the nearly 100-year history behind the legendary barbecue joint. Arthur learned to ‘cue from older brother Charlie, who passed on the secrets of Henry Perry, the “father of Kansas City barbecue.”

Perry got his start selling hot smoked meats bundled in newsprint. At Arthur Bryant’s, to-go orders are wrapped in butcher paper, which locks in that smoky barbecue flavor.

“We’re caretakers of a legacy,” Simpson said. “We’ve got to carry on a tradition of excellence.”

Tune in to facebook.com/chowtownkc at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 2, for Chow Town Live from Longboards Wraps & Bowls, 6269 N. Oak Trafficway. The surf-inspired cafe is known for grilled wraps, hot noodle bowls and Hawaiian sliders. While you’re there, don’t forget to like Chow Town on Facebook so you never miss a show. Mahalo!

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