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We know we should eat more fish, but we still don’t want to cook it

Most Americans prefer to eat their fish and seafood while eating out because they are intimdated to cook seafood at home. But health experts want us to eat more. Try The Star’s recipe for barramundi, also known as Austrailian Sea Bass.
Most Americans prefer to eat their fish and seafood while eating out because they are intimdated to cook seafood at home. But health experts want us to eat more. Try The Star’s recipe for barramundi, also known as Austrailian Sea Bass. tljungblad@kcstar.com

Do you feel like a fish out of water whenever you try to cook one for dinner?

Sure, fish is tasty and good for you — its health benefits are well documented. But most home cooks are intimidated to cook it at home for fear they’ll mess it up.

And really, considering the cost, who can blame them?

A NPD food industry trends report released this week confirms home cooks have spent the last year pushing the fish spatula and seafood crackers toward the back of the kitchen drawer, preferring instead to eat fish and seafood when dining out.

In-home dinner occasions that include fish and seafood has been flat for over a decade while shipments of shrimp, lobster and other crustaceans to independent and small chain restaurants increased by double digits over last year.

In a press release, David Portalatin, vice president of industry analysis for NPD Group and author of a new study “Eating Patterns in America,” concluded that “restaurants provide the expertise in selection and preparation of seafood consumers are looking for.”

The USDA recommends Americans eat a minimum of 8 ounces — that’s a filet approximately the size of two decks of cards — each week, but 80 percent to 90 percent of us don’t eat the recommended amount.

Kansas Citians who want to eat in — or out — can find local fish stories and recipes for Spicy Seafood Stew, Barramundi in Lemon Butter Sauce and Grilled Galician Octopus Salad from our spring “Fish to Table” special issue here.

Jill Wendholt Silva is The Star’s James Beard award-winning food editor. Reach her on Facebook, on Twitter at @kcstarfood and on Instagram at @jillwsilva.

In landlocked Midwest, fish and seafood can still be fresh, sustainable and local. Local seafood distributor, Seattle Fish Co. moves approximately three million pounds of fresh fish, shellfish, and seafood through the midwest annually. Sustainable

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