Billy Graham

Billy Graham: Religion and science can go hand in hand, if they’re properly understood

Q: Are science and religion opposed to each other? I'll be entering college in a few weeks, and I hope to become a doctor someday. But I’m a committed Christian, and I’m wondering what kind of problems I might have to face in some of my science classes. — A.J.

A: I’m thankful for your commitment to Jesus Christ, and also for the gifts and abilities God has given you. May you always seek his will for your life, and may God use you in the future to help others, physically and spiritually.

No, science and religion are not hostile or opposed to each other, not if they are properly understood. In fact, over the years I’ve been privileged to know a number of highly respected scientists and researchers who were also deeply committed to Jesus Christ. They knew that while science can help us understand the physical world, it will never be able to answer life’s deepest questions: Who are we? Why are we here? Where are we going? How should we live? Only God can answer these.

At the same time, don’t be surprised if you encounter indifference or even hostility to your faith, both inside and outside the classroom. We live in an increasingly secular world, and this is reflected in many of our universities. But don’t let the unbelief of others shake you. Remember: In Christ alone “are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Colossians 2:3).

Every day — no matter how busy you are — take time to be alone with God, praying and reading the Bible. In addition, ask God to lead you to other Christians on your campus, and make your fellowship with them a priority. You need them, and they need you. The Bible says, “Teach and admonish one another with all wisdom” (Colossians 3:16).

Write to the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, 1 Billy Graham Parkway, Charlotte, N.C., 28201 or go to BillyGraham.org.

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