Handyman

Securing a rimless kitchen sink

Fixing a loose-fitting rimless sink in a granite countertop should be done by a skilled carpenter or cabinetmaker
Fixing a loose-fitting rimless sink in a granite countertop should be done by a skilled carpenter or cabinetmaker The Associated Press

A few years ago we had our kitchen remodeled, adding new cabinets with a granite top. I chose a rimless kitchen sink because of the buildup around the rim of my older surface-mounted sink. My problem is the sink does not fit tight against the underside of the granite and it has to be caulked or it will leak. The contractor finally put two upright boards under the sink to hold it in place, but all that takes cabinet space and gets in the way. Do you have any suggestions so I can remove the boards?

I have seen what you have described in a very few of the upscale newer homes. When you have a granite top and a flush mount, rimless sink, there are only a few places under the granite where anchors can be installed into the granite to secure the sink. An anchor might damage the thin edge of the granite top where the sink is close to the front of the cabinet. I would imagine this is where the sink is pulling loose.

What I have done to repair this problem should be done by a professional to avoid any damage to the sink cabinet. Using the bracket from one of the anchors, I used a wood screw installed at an angle and screwed the bracket to the front trim of the wood cabinet. If the screw is too long or set at the wrong angle, the screw could penetrate the wood cabinet and split the wood. This type of repair should only be made by a skilled carpenter or cabinetmaker.

C. Dwight Barnett is a certified master inspector with the American Society of Home Inspectors.

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