Doctors found a tumor on the back of Ashley Dado’s brain when she was 10. After surgery and radiation treatments, Dado, now 22 and a senior at MidAmerica Nazarene University, is cancer-free, but she still faces health risks from her treatment. To monitor those risks, she became one of the first patients in a new program at the University of Kansas Cancer Center for adult survivors of childhood cancers.
Doctors found a tumor on the back of Ashley Dado’s brain when she was 10. After surgery and radiation treatments, Dado, now 22 and a senior at MidAmerica Nazarene University, is cancer-free, but she still faces health risks from her treatment. To monitor those risks, she became one of the first patients in a new program at the University of Kansas Cancer Center for adult survivors of childhood cancers. JILL TOYOSHIBA The Kansas City Star
Doctors found a tumor on the back of Ashley Dado’s brain when she was 10. After surgery and radiation treatments, Dado, now 22 and a senior at MidAmerica Nazarene University, is cancer-free, but she still faces health risks from her treatment. To monitor those risks, she became one of the first patients in a new program at the University of Kansas Cancer Center for adult survivors of childhood cancers. JILL TOYOSHIBA The Kansas City Star