Doctors found a tumor on the back of Ashley Dado’s brain when she was 10. After surgery and radiation treatments, Dado, now 22 and a senior at MidAmerica Nazarene University, is cancer-free, but she still faces health risks from her treatment. To monitor those risks, she became one of the first patients in a new program at the University of Kansas Cancer Center for adult survivors of childhood cancers.
Doctors found a tumor on the back of Ashley Dado’s brain when she was 10. After surgery and radiation treatments, Dado, now 22 and a senior at MidAmerica Nazarene University, is cancer-free, but she still faces health risks from her treatment. To monitor those risks, she became one of the first patients in a new program at the University of Kansas Cancer Center for adult survivors of childhood cancers. JILL TOYOSHIBA The Kansas City Star
Doctors found a tumor on the back of Ashley Dado’s brain when she was 10. After surgery and radiation treatments, Dado, now 22 and a senior at MidAmerica Nazarene University, is cancer-free, but she still faces health risks from her treatment. To monitor those risks, she became one of the first patients in a new program at the University of Kansas Cancer Center for adult survivors of childhood cancers. JILL TOYOSHIBA The Kansas City Star

Adult survivors of childhood cancer get help with late effects of treatment

December 04, 2014 08:33 PM