The Food Issue

Kansas City’s Uncommon Stock answers call for bone broth

Bone broth from Uncommon Stock is made from the bones of grass-fed, grass-finished cattle plus onions, carrots and herbs.
Bone broth from Uncommon Stock is made from the bones of grass-fed, grass-finished cattle plus onions, carrots and herbs. The Kansas City Star

When chef Marco Canora opened Brodo in New York City in November 2014, hipsters lined up around the block to get cardboard to-go cups filled with bone broth. No surprise there: Basketball star Kobe Bryant and “The Fault in Our Stars” actress Shailene Woodley (known for her lustrous tresses) say they sip the super soup daily, and Manhattan is the epicenter of food fads.

But when Kansas City’s Uncommon Stock began selling quart tubs of the tan, gelatinous broth, it got our attention.

Co-owner Todd Schulte, who also owns the restaurant Genessee Royale with business partner Bill Haw Jr., says adding bone broth to his existing soup line was not his idea. “Customers were asking for it, and it took me awhile to figure out the recipe through trial and error,” he says.

In order to extract the maximum amount of minerals, collagen and amino acids from the bones, you have to cook them for a long time — 24 hours at least.

Schulte uses bones from grass-fed, grass-finished cattle and adds onions, carrots and herbs at the end. For now, Schulte sells his bone broth only by the quart at his retail location off Southwest Boulevard and a few grocery stores.

The broth ($16 a quart at Nature’s Own Market) tastes as bland as it looks if you heat it and sip it as is. Adding salt, scallions or soy sauce or using the broth as the base for any soup recipe brings out the broth’s deep, long-simmered richness.

The broth keeps three or four days in the fridge or up to a year in the freezer.

Uncommon Stock bone broth: Sold at several area stores and at the factory, 1000 W. 25th St., Fridays and Saturdays; 816-510-7790; uncommonstock.com/bone-broth; Facebook.

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