Movie News & Reviews

Movie Mom: ‘Miss Peregrine,’ ‘Queen of Katwe,’ ‘Deepwater’ and more

Eva Green is Miss Peregrine, who takes in peculiar children.
Eva Green is Miss Peregrine, who takes in peculiar children. 20th Century Fox

Information for parents deciding which movies are best for kids ages 2 to 18:

“Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children”

Why it’s rated PG-13: Fantasy peril/violence involving children with some grotesque and disturbing images, including eyeless corpses, monsters pulling out people’s eyes, piles of children’s eyeballs, reanimated corpses and skeletons, wartime violence, references to murder, mild language, references to mental illness.

Minimum age: Middle school.

Family discussion: Which power would you want to have? Which would you not want to have? These books were inspired by old photos. Look at some old photos online and see what stories they can help you to imagine.

If you like this, try: The books by Ransom Riggs and the Harry Potter movies and books.

“The Queen of Katwe”

Why it’s rated PG: Themes of poverty and deprivation, child hurt in an accident with scenes of painful medical treatment, some references to sexual predators, out of wedlock teen pregnancy.

Minimum age: Middle school.

Family discussion: Why did Robert change his mind? Why did Phiona get cranky after she returned home?

If you like this, try: “Searching for Bobby Fischer,” “Brooklyn Castle” and “Endgame.”

“Deepwater Horizon”

Why it’s rated PG-13: Intense and graphic peril and violence with explosions and fire, characters injured and killed, disturbing images, sexual references and situation, some strong language.

Minimum age: High school.

Family discussion: Why do the people on the rig use the term “Mr.”? Who could have prevented the explosion?

If you like this, try: The documentary “The Great Invisible.”

“A Tale of Love and Darkness”

Why it’s rated PG-13: Sad death of a parent, suicide, wartime images, Holocaust references, drinking, smoking.

Minimum age: High school.

Family discussion: What are the parallels between what is going on in the family and what is going on with the creation of Israel? Why is Arieh so interested in the connections between words? What is the darkness in this story?

If you like this, try: The book by Amos Oz.

“The Dressmaker”

Why it’s rated R: Some strong language, drinking and drunkenness, sad deaths, devastating grief.

Minimum age: Mature teens.

Family discussion: What did Tilly hope for in returning home? Why was Teddy different from the other people in the town? Which consequence was the most just?

If you like this, try: “Muriel’s Wedding” and “Strictly Ballroom.”

Find Nell Minow’s reviews at Beliefnet on moviemom.com. Email: moviemom@moviemom.com.

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