Stargazing

World Cup sex: U.S. players can have it, Russians can’t

Players stretch themselves during Russian national soccer team training session in Itu, Brazil, on Thursday.
Players stretch themselves during Russian national soccer team training session in Itu, Brazil, on Thursday. AP

So who’s having a “good time” at the World Cup and who’s not? Depends on if you’re playing for one of the teams that have banned sex for its players. This week digital news outlet Quartz offered the rubdown, er, run-down.

Their “complete guide to World Cup sex rules” shows that Russia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chile and Mexico have all banned sex for their players during the event.

Teams that allow their players to have sex: the United States, Germany, Spain, Australia, Italy, Netherlands, Switzerland, Uruguay and England.

Things get a little tricker on some of the teams.

French players, for instance, can have sex, just not all night. The Brazilians can have sex but it can’t be too “acrobatic.” (We’d like to know who’s in charge of determining that.)

Costa Rica’s players can’t have sex until after their second-round games and the Nigerians can have sex with their wives but girlfriends are hands-off.

Obviously coaches and players have interpreted the science of sports sex – is that a thing? – differently.

“While researchers have found that sex is no physical detriment to athletic performance, some coaches are unconvinced,” writes Quartz.

Bosnia and Herzegovina must be in that last category. Coach Safet Susic told reporters back in April why he planned to ban sex for his players once they hit this worldwide stage.

“There will be no sex in Brazil,” Susic said. “They can find another solution, they can even masturbate if they want. I am not interested what the other coaches do, this is not a holiday trip, we are there to play football at the World Cup.”

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