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This will warm your heart: three Sikh men bhangra dancing while shoveling snow

A video of three Sikh men bhangra dancing while shoveling snow in Canada has gone viral in recent days. The Canada-based Maritime Bhangra Group released the video on Dec. 15.
A video of three Sikh men bhangra dancing while shoveling snow in Canada has gone viral in recent days. The Canada-based Maritime Bhangra Group released the video on Dec. 15. YouTube

When you have a lot of snow to shovel, you might as well dance.

A video of three Sikh men bhangra dancing while shoveling snow in Canada has gone viral in recent days.

The Canada-based Maritime Bhangra Group released a video on Dec. 15 that has been watched more than 1.5 million times on Facebook — a half million more times on YouTube — and has charmed thousands.

The three men are shoveling snow in a parking lot in Halifax, according to Quartz.

When the music starts they do a few steps holding their red shovels, but then toss them aside as they throw down with some serious bhangra moves.

“This might just be the best way to get through a Canadian winter,” proclaimed the CBC.

Bhangra is a dance of joy, Hasmeet Singh, who helped found the group, told the CBC. It originated in the agricultural province of Punjab, India, as a celebration of the harvest.

Members of the group met as students three years ago and often perform to raise money for various organizations, and to fight stereotypes Sikh men often face. Making short videos and putting them online was just a small part of the plan, Singh told A Plus.

“We try to contribute our culture as an addition to the amalgamation of cultures we have in this fabulous country — Canada,” he told A Plus.

“Spreading happiness is the other focus we had, as we were always told by the people watching us live that ‘It’s hard to watch you guys and not smile.’”

In September they posted a video of the group dancing at Canada’s iconic Peggys Cove in Nova Scotia that’s been viewed more than 1.6 million times on Facebook.

Singh thinks one reason the group’s videos have gone viral is because of the “amount of hatred we have right now in the world. We need more of anything which could help us forget all the hatred and help us relate to happiness in any way even for a bunch of seconds.”

They decided to perform a snowy dance — in T-shirts, no less — because shoveling is something Canadians can relate to.

“We wanted to make people happy,” Singh told the CBC. “We never thought it would be such a big hit.

“We get messages from people saying they have depression and they feel much better after watching the videos.”

The shoveling video includes a pitch at the end for donations to a nonprofit organization that supports research into Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, a nervous system disease that impacts mobility.

Among more than 1,000 largely positive messages left on Facebook about the video was one tiny caveat from one woman who wrote: “I’d be dangerous dancing with a shovel — feather boa more suitable a prop.”

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